Presentation Title

Characterization of Innate Immune Response in the Neonatal Rat Tongue Following Peripheral Nerve Injury

Advisor Information

Suzanne Sollars

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 10:30 AM

Abstract

There are well established differences in the way the taste system of rats is affected by peripheral nerve damage, depending on the age at which injury occurs. Following nerve loss, young animals undergo more severe changes than adults and these changes are permanent when injury occurs prior to taste system maturation. It is not yet understood why these developmentally -dependent variations in damage and recovery occur, however, differences in immune response have been suggested as a possible explanation. Neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, make up the first response of the immune system in reaction to injury or infection and can be quantified through the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining procedures. In the present study, the chorda tympani taste nerve was cut (CTX) in young or adult rats, and the neutrophil response in the tongue was assessed at 12, 24 or 48 hours after injury. Following tissue collection, tongues were frozen, sectioned and then stained using IHC procedures. Immunohistochemistry is a lengthy process which often requires a high degree of refinement and the present investigation is ongoing. It is expected that the neutrophil response will be substantially higher in young animals and that the increase in inflammation caused by elevated neutrophil presence contributes to both the larger changes in morphology and the lack of nerve regeneration seen in young animals following CTX. Results differing from these expectations would suggest investigation into other aspects of immune response (such as the later adaptive response) may be needed.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 9:00 AM Mar 6th, 10:30 AM

Characterization of Innate Immune Response in the Neonatal Rat Tongue Following Peripheral Nerve Injury

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

There are well established differences in the way the taste system of rats is affected by peripheral nerve damage, depending on the age at which injury occurs. Following nerve loss, young animals undergo more severe changes than adults and these changes are permanent when injury occurs prior to taste system maturation. It is not yet understood why these developmentally -dependent variations in damage and recovery occur, however, differences in immune response have been suggested as a possible explanation. Neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, make up the first response of the immune system in reaction to injury or infection and can be quantified through the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining procedures. In the present study, the chorda tympani taste nerve was cut (CTX) in young or adult rats, and the neutrophil response in the tongue was assessed at 12, 24 or 48 hours after injury. Following tissue collection, tongues were frozen, sectioned and then stained using IHC procedures. Immunohistochemistry is a lengthy process which often requires a high degree of refinement and the present investigation is ongoing. It is expected that the neutrophil response will be substantially higher in young animals and that the increase in inflammation caused by elevated neutrophil presence contributes to both the larger changes in morphology and the lack of nerve regeneration seen in young animals following CTX. Results differing from these expectations would suggest investigation into other aspects of immune response (such as the later adaptive response) may be needed.