Presentation Title

Archaeology in East Jerusalem and International Law

Advisor Information

Curtis Hutt

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 112

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 9:45 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 10:00 AM

Abstract

Archaeology done in Israel, especially in Jerusalem on the Temple Mount, is enveloped in complex tensions and it is imperative that the artifacts and other material remains are protected in the midst of mounting pressure. This research looks at different case studies in which the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property and its 1st and 2nd Protocols have been applied in East Jerusalem. The 1954 Hague Convention and its Protocols were set in place after WWII to ensure the protection of the material remains of a culture in times of conflict, which is directly applicable to the situation in Israel. In addition to case-studies on the use of international laws regarding the preservation and protection of cultural artifacts, this research also suggests that these laws can create an avenue through which the archaeology of this region can become a source of cooperation and possibly lasting communication between those who are stakeholders in the history of Jerusalem and, more broadly, the world. This is a new perspective on the ever-mounting state of affairs in the Middle East and how international laws have the potential to become a brick in the road to a peaceful solution in the study and presentation of the rich history of Israel. This material will be presented from the work done studying abroad and consulting experts in the field on the application of international law to archaeology.

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Mar 6th, 9:45 AM Mar 6th, 10:00 AM

Archaeology in East Jerusalem and International Law

UNO Criss Library, Room 112

Archaeology done in Israel, especially in Jerusalem on the Temple Mount, is enveloped in complex tensions and it is imperative that the artifacts and other material remains are protected in the midst of mounting pressure. This research looks at different case studies in which the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property and its 1st and 2nd Protocols have been applied in East Jerusalem. The 1954 Hague Convention and its Protocols were set in place after WWII to ensure the protection of the material remains of a culture in times of conflict, which is directly applicable to the situation in Israel. In addition to case-studies on the use of international laws regarding the preservation and protection of cultural artifacts, this research also suggests that these laws can create an avenue through which the archaeology of this region can become a source of cooperation and possibly lasting communication between those who are stakeholders in the history of Jerusalem and, more broadly, the world. This is a new perspective on the ever-mounting state of affairs in the Middle East and how international laws have the potential to become a brick in the road to a peaceful solution in the study and presentation of the rich history of Israel. This material will be presented from the work done studying abroad and consulting experts in the field on the application of international law to archaeology.