Presentation Title

High Performance IT Project Teams: A Comparative Study for Traditional and Agile Methodologies

Advisor Information

Stacie Petter

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

6-3-2015 1:15 PM

Abstract

In the software development world, agile methodologies offer an approach where piecewise functionalities of the whole system are developed incrementally through a series of rapid mini-development iterations. In contrast, traditional methodologies follow a sequential, phase-by-phase approach, which heavily relies upon lengthy yet careful planning prior to the actual development of the entire system. Because agile and traditional methodologies have their respective strengths and weaknesses, many organizations adopt a hybrid version of the methodologies that fit the organizations’ characteristics. The differences among the adopted methodologies, therefore, suggest the need to explore common and differentiating characteristics of IT project teams who deliver successful IT projects. Thus, we posed the following questions: (1) based on the adopted methodologies, what are the common and differentiating factors that influence IT project teams to delivery successful projects; and (2) how do those success factors interplay towards the creation of high performance IT project teams? This study employs a qualitative research design, particularly, a case study approach, to capture rich experiences and unfold insights, patterns and themes about the practices of successful IT project teams who employed combined agile and traditional methodologies. Data were gathered from IT project managers from multiple organizations and were eventually compared. Our study develops a process model that highlights the following IT project team characteristics: (a) composed of self-motivated members, (b) has good working relationships among members, (c) mindfully adheres to processes and timelines, (d) attentively meets customer requirements, and (e) conscientiously values stakeholder involvement. These characteristics parallel many of the success dimensions necessary for creating high performance IT project teams.

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Mar 6th, 1:00 PM Mar 6th, 1:15 PM

High Performance IT Project Teams: A Comparative Study for Traditional and Agile Methodologies

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

In the software development world, agile methodologies offer an approach where piecewise functionalities of the whole system are developed incrementally through a series of rapid mini-development iterations. In contrast, traditional methodologies follow a sequential, phase-by-phase approach, which heavily relies upon lengthy yet careful planning prior to the actual development of the entire system. Because agile and traditional methodologies have their respective strengths and weaknesses, many organizations adopt a hybrid version of the methodologies that fit the organizations’ characteristics. The differences among the adopted methodologies, therefore, suggest the need to explore common and differentiating characteristics of IT project teams who deliver successful IT projects. Thus, we posed the following questions: (1) based on the adopted methodologies, what are the common and differentiating factors that influence IT project teams to delivery successful projects; and (2) how do those success factors interplay towards the creation of high performance IT project teams? This study employs a qualitative research design, particularly, a case study approach, to capture rich experiences and unfold insights, patterns and themes about the practices of successful IT project teams who employed combined agile and traditional methodologies. Data were gathered from IT project managers from multiple organizations and were eventually compared. Our study develops a process model that highlights the following IT project team characteristics: (a) composed of self-motivated members, (b) has good working relationships among members, (c) mindfully adheres to processes and timelines, (d) attentively meets customer requirements, and (e) conscientiously values stakeholder involvement. These characteristics parallel many of the success dimensions necessary for creating high performance IT project teams.