Presentation Title

Generalized Self-Efficacy as a Moderator on Burnout and Outcomes for Working College Students

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 231

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:15 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 11:30 AM

Abstract

Burnout is increasingly posing a threat to employed college students (Alarcon, Edwards, & Menke, 2011). Malach-Pines (2005, p. 78-79) defined as “a state of physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion”. The risk for burnout is greater among the college student population because an increasing number of college students are employed (Riggert, Boyle, Petrosko, Ash & Rude-Parkins, 2006). Burnout often results in various detrimental academic, occupational, health and psychological outcomes (Yueh-Tzu, 2009); this can include academic disengagement, alcohol consumption, and increased intentions to quit school. The Job Demands- Resources model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) can be applied to explain burnout as a consequence of the demands faced by an individual at work and the resources they have to meet these demands; this model was originally developed for application in occupational contexts (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2011). My research applies this model to employed college students and expands the scope of demands and resources to those encountered in both occupational and academic settings. My presentation will discuss whether generalized self-efficacy (GSE) acts as a personal resource that mitigates the negative effects of life demands on burnout. Additionally, my presentation will explore how work-school demands faced by employed university students affect their rates of burnout, and consequently their rates of academic disengagement, alcohol consumption, and intentions to quit school.

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Mar 6th, 11:15 AM Mar 6th, 11:30 AM

Generalized Self-Efficacy as a Moderator on Burnout and Outcomes for Working College Students

UNO Criss Library, Room 231

Burnout is increasingly posing a threat to employed college students (Alarcon, Edwards, & Menke, 2011). Malach-Pines (2005, p. 78-79) defined as “a state of physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion”. The risk for burnout is greater among the college student population because an increasing number of college students are employed (Riggert, Boyle, Petrosko, Ash & Rude-Parkins, 2006). Burnout often results in various detrimental academic, occupational, health and psychological outcomes (Yueh-Tzu, 2009); this can include academic disengagement, alcohol consumption, and increased intentions to quit school. The Job Demands- Resources model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) can be applied to explain burnout as a consequence of the demands faced by an individual at work and the resources they have to meet these demands; this model was originally developed for application in occupational contexts (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2011). My research applies this model to employed college students and expands the scope of demands and resources to those encountered in both occupational and academic settings. My presentation will discuss whether generalized self-efficacy (GSE) acts as a personal resource that mitigates the negative effects of life demands on burnout. Additionally, my presentation will explore how work-school demands faced by employed university students affect their rates of burnout, and consequently their rates of academic disengagement, alcohol consumption, and intentions to quit school.