Presentation Title

Volunteers Working in Non-profit Organizations Serving Animal Welfare

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

6-3-2015 3:30 PM

Abstract

Volunteers are the lifeblood of non-profit organizations. They are critical to the success and sustainability of non-profits who serve communities. In fact, in 2012 64.5 million volunteers in the United States contributed 175 billion dollars’ worth of work (Corporation for National and Community Service, 2013). Alarmingly, volunteering is the lowest it has been in the history of the United States. This problem necessitates research and identifying ways to improve volunteers’ experiences and retention rates. This study, which represents an independent research project, examined satisfaction of volunteers working in animal welfare facility in the midwest. The goal of the study was to determine the strengths and growth areas identified by the volunteer participants and to suggest practices for improving volunteer retention. The three strengths identified for this particular organization was the volunteers satisfaction with volunteer coordinator, nature of work they conducted for their duties, and commitment to the organization. Oppositely, areas of concern identified were dissatisfaction with the organization listening to their ideas for improvement (perception of voice), volunteer management practices, and communication within the organization. Recommendations returned to the volunteer coordinator were to provide a monthly newsletter, more thorough and adequate training, and increase lines of upward and downward communication, to volunteers. The chosen recommendations came from applied literature as well as industrial organizational psychology constructs to leverage and improve the volunteer experience.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 2:00 PM Mar 6th, 3:30 PM

Volunteers Working in Non-profit Organizations Serving Animal Welfare

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Volunteers are the lifeblood of non-profit organizations. They are critical to the success and sustainability of non-profits who serve communities. In fact, in 2012 64.5 million volunteers in the United States contributed 175 billion dollars’ worth of work (Corporation for National and Community Service, 2013). Alarmingly, volunteering is the lowest it has been in the history of the United States. This problem necessitates research and identifying ways to improve volunteers’ experiences and retention rates. This study, which represents an independent research project, examined satisfaction of volunteers working in animal welfare facility in the midwest. The goal of the study was to determine the strengths and growth areas identified by the volunteer participants and to suggest practices for improving volunteer retention. The three strengths identified for this particular organization was the volunteers satisfaction with volunteer coordinator, nature of work they conducted for their duties, and commitment to the organization. Oppositely, areas of concern identified were dissatisfaction with the organization listening to their ideas for improvement (perception of voice), volunteer management practices, and communication within the organization. Recommendations returned to the volunteer coordinator were to provide a monthly newsletter, more thorough and adequate training, and increase lines of upward and downward communication, to volunteers. The chosen recommendations came from applied literature as well as industrial organizational psychology constructs to leverage and improve the volunteer experience.