Presentation Title

Information Seeking: The Role of Information Search in Creative Problem-Solving

Advisor Information

Roni Reiter-Palmon

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:30 PM

Abstract

As technology such as tablets and smart phones become the norm, and information becomes more easily available, it is important to understand differences in how people search for information to solve a problem in an effective and creative manner. While exhausting all possible information related to a problem would be impractical, searching for too little or irrelevant information may hinder performance. In this research, we developed a computer program that tracked information seeking behavior during a complex, problem-solving task. We also asked participants to restate the problem prior to beginning the search task, in order to separate cognitive processes known to underlie creativity. The results suggested that the ways in which people frame problems influence information search, which in turn influences creativity. The implications of this study and directions for future research are discussed.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 12:30 PM

Information Seeking: The Role of Information Search in Creative Problem-Solving

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

As technology such as tablets and smart phones become the norm, and information becomes more easily available, it is important to understand differences in how people search for information to solve a problem in an effective and creative manner. While exhausting all possible information related to a problem would be impractical, searching for too little or irrelevant information may hinder performance. In this research, we developed a computer program that tracked information seeking behavior during a complex, problem-solving task. We also asked participants to restate the problem prior to beginning the search task, in order to separate cognitive processes known to underlie creativity. The results suggested that the ways in which people frame problems influence information search, which in turn influences creativity. The implications of this study and directions for future research are discussed.