Presentation Title

The effect of structured auditory stimulation on movement human movement variability and associated cortical involvement

Advisor Information

Nicholas Stergiou

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:30 PM

Abstract

Movement variability in many rhythmic behaviors often exhibits characteristic temporal structures. In gait and tapping, stride to stride, and beat to beat variations are marked by long-term correlations in time. Motivated by evidence suggesting that changes in the temporal structure of movement variability often accompanies pathology, we explore the possibility manipulating the temporal structure of movement using variants of structured auditory stimuli to which participants in our experiments intentionally coordinated. Stimuli comprised of a rhythmic metronomic beat with varying temporal noise structures (e.g. white, pink, brown) were investigated in both tapping and locomotion tasks. Our results show that the stimuli were effective at changing the variability structure of the observed movement patterns. We also report an accompanying analyses of cortical involvement measured through functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 12:30 PM

The effect of structured auditory stimulation on movement human movement variability and associated cortical involvement

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Movement variability in many rhythmic behaviors often exhibits characteristic temporal structures. In gait and tapping, stride to stride, and beat to beat variations are marked by long-term correlations in time. Motivated by evidence suggesting that changes in the temporal structure of movement variability often accompanies pathology, we explore the possibility manipulating the temporal structure of movement using variants of structured auditory stimuli to which participants in our experiments intentionally coordinated. Stimuli comprised of a rhythmic metronomic beat with varying temporal noise structures (e.g. white, pink, brown) were investigated in both tapping and locomotion tasks. Our results show that the stimuli were effective at changing the variability structure of the observed movement patterns. We also report an accompanying analyses of cortical involvement measured through functional near-infrared spectroscopy.