Presentation Title

An Application of the Work-Demands Resources Model to Understanding Working College Student Outcomes

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 112

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:30 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 11:45 AM

Abstract

Bakker’s (2007) Job-Demands Resources (JD-R) model predicts that stress and negative life outcomes will increase as the job demands operating on a person increase; however, as the number of resources available increase so will their ability to cope with these negative effects of demands on wellness. The JD-R model was developed for employees in a work context. My research adapted the JD-R model to assess the wellness of working, college students who experience a myriad of demands beyond that of just work. Many students today work part-time or full-time jobs, in addition they take a full load of college courses, care for their families, and desire to socialize with friends. The literature suggests that too many demands on students can lead them to drop out of college (Barefoot 2004; Daley, 2010). My presentation will discuss if resources available to students are able to combat these demands and increase student wellness. Wellness is vital as studies indicate that students who experience a higher level of wellness are more likely to continue with their academic studies, earn a higher grade-point average, and produce better career outcomes (Botha, 2012; Hettler, 1980; Horton, 2009). My presentation will discuss how working, college student perceptions of their total life demands and total life resources effect their wellness and in turn their intentions to quit school and their academic success.

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Mar 6th, 11:30 AM Mar 6th, 11:45 AM

An Application of the Work-Demands Resources Model to Understanding Working College Student Outcomes

UNO Criss Library, Room 112

Bakker’s (2007) Job-Demands Resources (JD-R) model predicts that stress and negative life outcomes will increase as the job demands operating on a person increase; however, as the number of resources available increase so will their ability to cope with these negative effects of demands on wellness. The JD-R model was developed for employees in a work context. My research adapted the JD-R model to assess the wellness of working, college students who experience a myriad of demands beyond that of just work. Many students today work part-time or full-time jobs, in addition they take a full load of college courses, care for their families, and desire to socialize with friends. The literature suggests that too many demands on students can lead them to drop out of college (Barefoot 2004; Daley, 2010). My presentation will discuss if resources available to students are able to combat these demands and increase student wellness. Wellness is vital as studies indicate that students who experience a higher level of wellness are more likely to continue with their academic studies, earn a higher grade-point average, and produce better career outcomes (Botha, 2012; Hettler, 1980; Horton, 2009). My presentation will discuss how working, college student perceptions of their total life demands and total life resources effect their wellness and in turn their intentions to quit school and their academic success.