Presentation Title

The impact of exposure intervals to 17β-trenbolone as its metabolite profile in the sediment and water column changes

Advisor Information

Alan Kolok

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 10:15 AM

Abstract

Throughout the United States, bodies of water are contaminated with a variety of endocrine disrupting compounds that enter through surface runoff or groundwater absorption. Such compounds include pesticides, industrial wastes, and veterinary pharmaceuticals. One such veterinary pharmaceutical that commonly occurs is 17 -trenbolone, a growthpromoting hormone in the cattle industry. Considering the biological activity of 17β-trenbolone, it is important to understand the fate and transport of this compound in the environment. 17β-trenbolone is a synthetic androgen, and it, along with its metabolites readily absorb to sediment. Our lab has done several exposures in which the importance of sediment in causing endocrine disruption was been demonstrated. The objective of the present study was to determine the impact of exposure intervals to 17β-trenbolone as its metabolite profile in the sediment and water column changes. Sediment was spiked with 17β-trenbolone and groups of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to it for 5 or 10 days. Fish exposed for the first 5 days (d 0-5) after sediment spiking experienced molecular defeminization, while those exposed to for the next 5 days (d 5-10) and those exposed for 10 days (d 0-10) after spiking did not. The results suggest a very rapid loss of the compound from the system, a result that is not consistent with our previous data. Subtle differences in experimental protocol with respect to spiking of the sediment are likely causing significant differences in the degree to which the chemical is adhering to the sediment particles.

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Mar 6th, 10:00 AM Mar 6th, 10:15 AM

The impact of exposure intervals to 17β-trenbolone as its metabolite profile in the sediment and water column changes

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Throughout the United States, bodies of water are contaminated with a variety of endocrine disrupting compounds that enter through surface runoff or groundwater absorption. Such compounds include pesticides, industrial wastes, and veterinary pharmaceuticals. One such veterinary pharmaceutical that commonly occurs is 17 -trenbolone, a growthpromoting hormone in the cattle industry. Considering the biological activity of 17β-trenbolone, it is important to understand the fate and transport of this compound in the environment. 17β-trenbolone is a synthetic androgen, and it, along with its metabolites readily absorb to sediment. Our lab has done several exposures in which the importance of sediment in causing endocrine disruption was been demonstrated. The objective of the present study was to determine the impact of exposure intervals to 17β-trenbolone as its metabolite profile in the sediment and water column changes. Sediment was spiked with 17β-trenbolone and groups of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to it for 5 or 10 days. Fish exposed for the first 5 days (d 0-5) after sediment spiking experienced molecular defeminization, while those exposed to for the next 5 days (d 5-10) and those exposed for 10 days (d 0-10) after spiking did not. The results suggest a very rapid loss of the compound from the system, a result that is not consistent with our previous data. Subtle differences in experimental protocol with respect to spiking of the sediment are likely causing significant differences in the degree to which the chemical is adhering to the sediment particles.