Presentation Title

Children’s looking preference for biological motion may be related to an affinity for mathematical chaos

Advisor Information

Anastasia Kyvelidou

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:30 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of perceived object motion on concurrent sensorimotor behavior of typically developing children. Synchronous eye movement and standing posture recordings were taken while a moving pointlight stimulus was displayed on a monitor in front of the participant. The stimulus moved according to a predefined motion trajectory; Sine, Chaos, and Brown Noise. Cross recurrence quantification analysis was used to assess coupling of gaze and posture to the stimulus, separately, as well to gauge sensorimotor coupling. A significant stimulus effect was found for Gaze percent determinism. Rate of coordination of gaze to stimulus motion was similar in response to Sine and Chaos conditions, but was lesser than each for the Brown Noise condition. Duration of coordination of gaze responded to the structure of stimulus motion and was highest with Chaos. A significant stimulus effect was found for COP percent determinism. Differences were found among each of the conditions, with the greatest rate of coordination in response to the Sine stimulus and the least rate of coordination in response to the Brown Noise stimulus. No main effect of stimulus was found for SensMot, for either percent determinism or maxline. No main effect of age or interactions was found for any outcome for Gaze, COP, or SensMot. These results raise the possibility that children may recognize chaotic motion structures and may have a preference for coordination with them. The lack of SensMot coupling raise questions for the development of perception and production of intentional action.

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Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 12:30 PM

Children’s looking preference for biological motion may be related to an affinity for mathematical chaos

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of perceived object motion on concurrent sensorimotor behavior of typically developing children. Synchronous eye movement and standing posture recordings were taken while a moving pointlight stimulus was displayed on a monitor in front of the participant. The stimulus moved according to a predefined motion trajectory; Sine, Chaos, and Brown Noise. Cross recurrence quantification analysis was used to assess coupling of gaze and posture to the stimulus, separately, as well to gauge sensorimotor coupling. A significant stimulus effect was found for Gaze percent determinism. Rate of coordination of gaze to stimulus motion was similar in response to Sine and Chaos conditions, but was lesser than each for the Brown Noise condition. Duration of coordination of gaze responded to the structure of stimulus motion and was highest with Chaos. A significant stimulus effect was found for COP percent determinism. Differences were found among each of the conditions, with the greatest rate of coordination in response to the Sine stimulus and the least rate of coordination in response to the Brown Noise stimulus. No main effect of stimulus was found for SensMot, for either percent determinism or maxline. No main effect of age or interactions was found for any outcome for Gaze, COP, or SensMot. These results raise the possibility that children may recognize chaotic motion structures and may have a preference for coordination with them. The lack of SensMot coupling raise questions for the development of perception and production of intentional action.