Presentation Title

Improvements in joint torques and powers before and after surgery for patients with peripheral arterial disease

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:30 PM

Abstract

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or atherosclerosis of the leg arteries, is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Intermittent claudication (IC) is the most common symptom of PAD and defined as walking-induced leg muscle pain relieved by rest. Surgical revascularization is recommended for patients with moderate to severe occlusions. This study determined the differences in lower extremity joint torques and powers of the before and after surgery. 24 patients with PAD were recruited from the Omaha Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center. The subjects performed walking trials at a self-selected speed through a ten-meter pathway while kinematics and kinetics were recorded. Subjects completed five trials on each leg before and after the onset of claudication. Testing was performed prior to and three months following surgery. Patients with PAD have reduced muscular contributions of the ankle, knee, and hip during the stance phase both before and after the onset of IC compared with healthy controls (Wurdeman et al., 2012). Following revascularization, patients in the pain-free condition have significantly increased ankle power absorption (p<0.001), and hip power generation (p=0.002) in early stance and ankle power generation (p=0.007) in late stance. During the pain condition, peak ankle dorsiflexion torque (p=0.023), and ankle power absorption (p<0.001) in early stance, and ankle power generation (p=0.005) in late stance were significantly increased after surgery. Thus, increases in lower extremity torques and powers represent an improvement following surgical revascularization, reinforcing this treatment method, aimed at restoring hemodynamics and improving function in these patients.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 12:30 PM

Improvements in joint torques and powers before and after surgery for patients with peripheral arterial disease

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or atherosclerosis of the leg arteries, is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Intermittent claudication (IC) is the most common symptom of PAD and defined as walking-induced leg muscle pain relieved by rest. Surgical revascularization is recommended for patients with moderate to severe occlusions. This study determined the differences in lower extremity joint torques and powers of the before and after surgery. 24 patients with PAD were recruited from the Omaha Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center. The subjects performed walking trials at a self-selected speed through a ten-meter pathway while kinematics and kinetics were recorded. Subjects completed five trials on each leg before and after the onset of claudication. Testing was performed prior to and three months following surgery. Patients with PAD have reduced muscular contributions of the ankle, knee, and hip during the stance phase both before and after the onset of IC compared with healthy controls (Wurdeman et al., 2012). Following revascularization, patients in the pain-free condition have significantly increased ankle power absorption (p<0.001), and hip power generation (p=0.002) in early stance and ankle power generation (p=0.007) in late stance. During the pain condition, peak ankle dorsiflexion torque (p=0.023), and ankle power absorption (p<0.001) in early stance, and ankle power generation (p=0.005) in late stance were significantly increased after surgery. Thus, increases in lower extremity torques and powers represent an improvement following surgical revascularization, reinforcing this treatment method, aimed at restoring hemodynamics and improving function in these patients.