Presentation Title

As Risk of Falls Increase in the Elderly, Standing Postural Control Shows Stronger Long-Range Correlations

Advisor Information

Mukul Mukherjee

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 10:30 AM

Abstract

Aging is associated with changes in physical function that leads to increased risk of falling. Within the aged population it’s not clear how risks of falls may be associated with postural control. This research investigates postural control in early/late aging and considers magnitude and structure of movement variability. Methods: Three groups participated: young (Y), early (E), and late aging (LA). A force platform recorded center of pressure (COP) in three conditions: normal standing, absent vision, and faulty vision. The COP values were used to calculate range, root mean square, and long-range correlations (using detrended fluctuation analysis; DFA) of postural sway. The EA and LA group also performed the timed up and go (TUG) test and a fall risk questionnaire. A 3x3 mixed model ANOVA compared COP variables and independent samples t-tests compared fall- risk measures. Results: Comparisons between groups revealed differences between the Y and LA groups. The LA group had an increased ML range and ML DFA. When comparing the LA and EA groups for measures of fall risk the LA group demonstrated higher scores on the questionnaire and longer time on the TUG. Conclusions: These results demonstrate an increase ML sway for the LA group. Such sway patterns are very regular with low variability. Postural control is constrained with reduced ability to respond to environmental perturbations. This is demonstrated in increased fall-risks in this group. Therefore, within an aged group there is deterioration of postural control, specifically in terms of flexibility within the temporal patterns of ML sway.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 9:00 AM Mar 6th, 10:30 AM

As Risk of Falls Increase in the Elderly, Standing Postural Control Shows Stronger Long-Range Correlations

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Aging is associated with changes in physical function that leads to increased risk of falling. Within the aged population it’s not clear how risks of falls may be associated with postural control. This research investigates postural control in early/late aging and considers magnitude and structure of movement variability. Methods: Three groups participated: young (Y), early (E), and late aging (LA). A force platform recorded center of pressure (COP) in three conditions: normal standing, absent vision, and faulty vision. The COP values were used to calculate range, root mean square, and long-range correlations (using detrended fluctuation analysis; DFA) of postural sway. The EA and LA group also performed the timed up and go (TUG) test and a fall risk questionnaire. A 3x3 mixed model ANOVA compared COP variables and independent samples t-tests compared fall- risk measures. Results: Comparisons between groups revealed differences between the Y and LA groups. The LA group had an increased ML range and ML DFA. When comparing the LA and EA groups for measures of fall risk the LA group demonstrated higher scores on the questionnaire and longer time on the TUG. Conclusions: These results demonstrate an increase ML sway for the LA group. Such sway patterns are very regular with low variability. Postural control is constrained with reduced ability to respond to environmental perturbations. This is demonstrated in increased fall-risks in this group. Therefore, within an aged group there is deterioration of postural control, specifically in terms of flexibility within the temporal patterns of ML sway.