Presentation Title

Strength Profiles Following Supervised Treadmill Exercise Treatment in Peripheral Arterial Disease

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:30 PM

Abstract

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a cardiovascular disease involving atherosclerosis is the lower extremity arteries, which affects almost 12 million people in the U.S. The main symptom is claudication, or pain in the legs caused by walking when the muscles do not receive adequate blood flow and thus oxygen through the blocked leg arteries. Decreases in muscular strength and power generation has been shown in these patients in all three lower extremity joints, of which the ankle is most affected. Treatment involves supervised treadmill exercise, which improves walking distances, but the effect on muscular strength is unknown. Thus, the objective is to investigate muscular strength profiles of the ankle plantarflexors in patients with PAD before and after a supervised treadmill exercise program. Muscular strength tests were performed before and after six months of supervised treadmill exercise, which consisted of intermittent walking for 60 minutes per session, three days per week. Strength was measured by performing two maximal repetitions of isometric plantarflexion using isometric dynamometry (Biodex Medical Systems). Peak torque, time to peak torque, mean, standard deviation, and loading rate were recorded. After exercise treatment, peak torque and average torque improved. Results show that treadmill exercise improves strength, however, it is unknown whether gait deficits associated with PAD persist after treadmill exercise. These findings could lead to development of more effective exercise interventions that could improve gait performance.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 12:30 PM

Strength Profiles Following Supervised Treadmill Exercise Treatment in Peripheral Arterial Disease

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a cardiovascular disease involving atherosclerosis is the lower extremity arteries, which affects almost 12 million people in the U.S. The main symptom is claudication, or pain in the legs caused by walking when the muscles do not receive adequate blood flow and thus oxygen through the blocked leg arteries. Decreases in muscular strength and power generation has been shown in these patients in all three lower extremity joints, of which the ankle is most affected. Treatment involves supervised treadmill exercise, which improves walking distances, but the effect on muscular strength is unknown. Thus, the objective is to investigate muscular strength profiles of the ankle plantarflexors in patients with PAD before and after a supervised treadmill exercise program. Muscular strength tests were performed before and after six months of supervised treadmill exercise, which consisted of intermittent walking for 60 minutes per session, three days per week. Strength was measured by performing two maximal repetitions of isometric plantarflexion using isometric dynamometry (Biodex Medical Systems). Peak torque, time to peak torque, mean, standard deviation, and loading rate were recorded. After exercise treatment, peak torque and average torque improved. Results show that treadmill exercise improves strength, however, it is unknown whether gait deficits associated with PAD persist after treadmill exercise. These findings could lead to development of more effective exercise interventions that could improve gait performance.