Presentation Title

Perception of Complex Movement in Typically Developing Children and Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Advisor Information

Anastasia Kyvelidou

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

6-3-2015 3:30 PM

Abstract

Typically developing children prefer to watch locomotion coherent with their own mode of locomotion. The development of motor behavior relies, in part, on being able to incorporate the lessons learned from viewing others’ attempts at similar motor performance. By watching others, we are able to vastly multiply our own experience and knowledge of successful movement strategies. We suggest that the specific aversion to the complex temporo-spatial aspects of others’ movements is related directly to the perception of chaotic motion of the observed individual. Thus, the purpose of the current project was to assess gaze and postural behavior of young children, with and without autism in response to visual stimuli of different temporal complexity. Eight children participated; four have been diagnosed with autism (ASD). Participants attended single collection, which contained measures of eye movements and standing posture (COP) while viewing a point-light stimulus. Motion of the stimulus differed across three conditions, by scaling temporal complexity in terms of approximate entropy; a sine wave, chaos, and brown noise. While not directly supporting our proposed hypothesis, the results do highlight differing responsiveness to motion structure between children with and without ASD The present data suggests that the gaze and postural sway of children with ASD differs from those without. These differences are noticeable in the complexity of temporal variations of each behavior, in response to a stimulus of specific complexity.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 2:00 PM Mar 6th, 3:30 PM

Perception of Complex Movement in Typically Developing Children and Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Typically developing children prefer to watch locomotion coherent with their own mode of locomotion. The development of motor behavior relies, in part, on being able to incorporate the lessons learned from viewing others’ attempts at similar motor performance. By watching others, we are able to vastly multiply our own experience and knowledge of successful movement strategies. We suggest that the specific aversion to the complex temporo-spatial aspects of others’ movements is related directly to the perception of chaotic motion of the observed individual. Thus, the purpose of the current project was to assess gaze and postural behavior of young children, with and without autism in response to visual stimuli of different temporal complexity. Eight children participated; four have been diagnosed with autism (ASD). Participants attended single collection, which contained measures of eye movements and standing posture (COP) while viewing a point-light stimulus. Motion of the stimulus differed across three conditions, by scaling temporal complexity in terms of approximate entropy; a sine wave, chaos, and brown noise. While not directly supporting our proposed hypothesis, the results do highlight differing responsiveness to motion structure between children with and without ASD The present data suggests that the gaze and postural sway of children with ASD differs from those without. These differences are noticeable in the complexity of temporal variations of each behavior, in response to a stimulus of specific complexity.