Presentation Title

9 Parts of Desire': Shadows of Ourselves in the Women of Iraq

Advisor Information

Cindy Melby Phaneuf

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 249

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:45 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:00 PM

Abstract

9 Parts of Desire by Heather Raffo was produced with support by a GRACA grant and the UNO Theatre Department as part of the UNO Theatre Festival in the fall semester of 2014. This play uses a series of monologues to examine the effects of war on nine Iraqi women. The characters never meet or interact, but their interconnectedness is palpable. They are echoes or shadows of each other. Taken together, they form a compelling portrait of the Iraqi woman who is more similar to the Western woman than might at first appear. These women are driven by the same deep desires that inspire women everywhere: the search for love, acceptance, respect, safety, and passion. This production was intended to help destroy preconceived notions about Iraqi women based on media appearances and Western bias, as well as to inspire discussion and encourage the crossing of cultural boundaries.

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Mar 6th, 11:45 AM Mar 6th, 12:00 PM

9 Parts of Desire': Shadows of Ourselves in the Women of Iraq

UNO Criss Library, Room 249

9 Parts of Desire by Heather Raffo was produced with support by a GRACA grant and the UNO Theatre Department as part of the UNO Theatre Festival in the fall semester of 2014. This play uses a series of monologues to examine the effects of war on nine Iraqi women. The characters never meet or interact, but their interconnectedness is palpable. They are echoes or shadows of each other. Taken together, they form a compelling portrait of the Iraqi woman who is more similar to the Western woman than might at first appear. These women are driven by the same deep desires that inspire women everywhere: the search for love, acceptance, respect, safety, and passion. This production was intended to help destroy preconceived notions about Iraqi women based on media appearances and Western bias, as well as to inspire discussion and encourage the crossing of cultural boundaries.