Presentation Title

Gender typicality and popularity: Relationships among felt pressure, intergroup biases, and contentment

Advisor Information

Jonathan Santo

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:30 PM

Abstract

Felt pressure to behave in gender-typical ways, intergroup gender biases, the degree of gender contentment, and how gender-typical children consider themselves may all play a role in the relationship between peers’ assessment of behavior and popularity. Egan and Perry (2001) developed scales to measure these variables, and showed that they are associated with adjustment among children. The present study examined how these variables are related to peer nominations of gender typicality and popularity. Data were collected from 181 children (47.50% female) in grades five and six (mean age = 10.67, S.D. = .55) in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The current findings illustrate the various means by which gender roles are associated with whether a child is perceived as typical and/or atypical for their gender by peers and how those are tied to popularity. Sex differences are also explored.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 12:30 PM

Gender typicality and popularity: Relationships among felt pressure, intergroup biases, and contentment

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Felt pressure to behave in gender-typical ways, intergroup gender biases, the degree of gender contentment, and how gender-typical children consider themselves may all play a role in the relationship between peers’ assessment of behavior and popularity. Egan and Perry (2001) developed scales to measure these variables, and showed that they are associated with adjustment among children. The present study examined how these variables are related to peer nominations of gender typicality and popularity. Data were collected from 181 children (47.50% female) in grades five and six (mean age = 10.67, S.D. = .55) in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The current findings illustrate the various means by which gender roles are associated with whether a child is perceived as typical and/or atypical for their gender by peers and how those are tied to popularity. Sex differences are also explored.