Presentation Title

Gait Biomechanics Are Not Improved Following Supervised Treadmill Exercise in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:30 PM

Abstract

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a vascular disease that affects approximately 12 million Americans. PAD is characterized by intermittent claudication which occurs because atherosclerotic blockages restrict blood flow to the lower extremities1. Consequently, persons with PAD feel pain and discomfort with activity and often succumb to a sedentary lifestyle3. Currently, conservative treatment for patients with PAD involves supervised treadmill walking exercise (STW). After STW, patients with PAD have been shown to improve their maximum walking distance, however, little is known about the mechanistic changes that occur2. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of STW on walking distance, gait biomechanics, and lower extremity strength in patients with PAD. Fifteen patients (66.0+1.9years; 175+2.24cm; 89.2+5.0kg) underwent gait evaluation before and after participating in a 12-week STW intervention. Evaluations involved the Gardner Treadmill Test and five walking trials per limb where a minute of rest was given between each trial. Absolute walking distance, lower extremity strength, ankle, knee, and hip torque and power were analyzed pre and post-STW with dependent ttests. Absolute walking distance significantly increased (101.5m to 268.8m) post-STW (p=.02). However, there were no significant differences between pre and post-STW for joint torques, powers, or lower extremity strength. Lack of improvements in gait biomechanics suggests that STW addresses a cardiovascular mechanism in PAD, possibly only helping improve walking economy and/or pain tolerance. Additionally, muscular myopathy present in patients with PAD is likely unchanged post-STW.

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Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 12:30 PM

Gait Biomechanics Are Not Improved Following Supervised Treadmill Exercise in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a vascular disease that affects approximately 12 million Americans. PAD is characterized by intermittent claudication which occurs because atherosclerotic blockages restrict blood flow to the lower extremities1. Consequently, persons with PAD feel pain and discomfort with activity and often succumb to a sedentary lifestyle3. Currently, conservative treatment for patients with PAD involves supervised treadmill walking exercise (STW). After STW, patients with PAD have been shown to improve their maximum walking distance, however, little is known about the mechanistic changes that occur2. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of STW on walking distance, gait biomechanics, and lower extremity strength in patients with PAD. Fifteen patients (66.0+1.9years; 175+2.24cm; 89.2+5.0kg) underwent gait evaluation before and after participating in a 12-week STW intervention. Evaluations involved the Gardner Treadmill Test and five walking trials per limb where a minute of rest was given between each trial. Absolute walking distance, lower extremity strength, ankle, knee, and hip torque and power were analyzed pre and post-STW with dependent ttests. Absolute walking distance significantly increased (101.5m to 268.8m) post-STW (p=.02). However, there were no significant differences between pre and post-STW for joint torques, powers, or lower extremity strength. Lack of improvements in gait biomechanics suggests that STW addresses a cardiovascular mechanism in PAD, possibly only helping improve walking economy and/or pain tolerance. Additionally, muscular myopathy present in patients with PAD is likely unchanged post-STW.