Presentation Title

Perceptions of Classroom Physical Activity

Advisor Information

Danae Dinkel

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

6-3-2015 3:30 PM

Abstract

Background: Few children meet the physical activity recommendations. One new and innovative way schools have tried to increase children’s physical activity is through classroom physical activity breaks. Studies have found that classroom physical activity breaks not only increase physical activity but also increase children’s time on-task as well as academic scores. However little is known about teachers’ perceptions of brain breaks. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to determine teacher’s perception of brain breaks. Methods: Two school districts in a metropolitan Midwest City were recruited to participate. Twelve teachers from each district took part in a semi-structured interview over the phone (n=26). Semistructured interview questions were developed based on the socio-ecological model. Data were analyzed using the process of immersion/crystallization. Results: Factors from all five levels of the socio-ecological model impacted teachers’ perceptions. At the individual level, teachers chose to implement brain breaks primarily because of cognitive rationales (n=24) (i.e., to improve focus). At the interpersonal level half of teachers noted little to no collaboration with other faculty in regard to brain breaks. At the organization level, most teachers believed their district would be supportive of brain breaks (n=23). At the community level, less than half believed it would be helpful to have resources and programming come from community partners (n=9). Finally, at the policy level, teachers were unaware of any guidelines or policies associated with brain breaks (n=18). Conclusion: Results provide preliminary evidence that teachers have a positive view of classroom physical activity breaks.

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Mar 6th, 2:00 PM Mar 6th, 3:30 PM

Perceptions of Classroom Physical Activity

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Background: Few children meet the physical activity recommendations. One new and innovative way schools have tried to increase children’s physical activity is through classroom physical activity breaks. Studies have found that classroom physical activity breaks not only increase physical activity but also increase children’s time on-task as well as academic scores. However little is known about teachers’ perceptions of brain breaks. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to determine teacher’s perception of brain breaks. Methods: Two school districts in a metropolitan Midwest City were recruited to participate. Twelve teachers from each district took part in a semi-structured interview over the phone (n=26). Semistructured interview questions were developed based on the socio-ecological model. Data were analyzed using the process of immersion/crystallization. Results: Factors from all five levels of the socio-ecological model impacted teachers’ perceptions. At the individual level, teachers chose to implement brain breaks primarily because of cognitive rationales (n=24) (i.e., to improve focus). At the interpersonal level half of teachers noted little to no collaboration with other faculty in regard to brain breaks. At the organization level, most teachers believed their district would be supportive of brain breaks (n=23). At the community level, less than half believed it would be helpful to have resources and programming come from community partners (n=9). Finally, at the policy level, teachers were unaware of any guidelines or policies associated with brain breaks (n=18). Conclusion: Results provide preliminary evidence that teachers have a positive view of classroom physical activity breaks.