Presentation Title

Sex Steroids, Neuropeptides, and Parental Behavior in Mongolian Gerbils

Advisor Information

Jeffrey French

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 3:15 PM

End Date

6-3-2015 3:30 PM

Abstract

The willingness to respond to and care for offspring is dependent on a complex interaction between influences, and hormones can affect behavior via brain development, activation of existing systems, or a combination of both. Increases in parental behavior are often associated with or caused by concurrent decreases in testosterone, or increases in oxytocin(OT) and arginine vasopressin(AVP). Testosterone is necessary both during early development and at the onset of parenthood for neuropeptide receptor organization in the brain. Less is known though, about how neuropeptide levels during develop affect androgen receptor organization. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether levels of neuropeptides early in life influence androgen receptor development and subsequently, sensitivity to androgen mediated changes in spontaneous parental care. Specifically, we expected that if neuropeptide levels during early life affect androgen receptor development, then gerbils treated with OT or AVP receptor agonists will be more sensitive to androgen manipulations when expressing androgenmediated behavior, spontaneous parental care. In contrast, we also expect the gerbils treated with neuropeptide receptor antagonists will be less sensitive to androgen manipulations when expressing androgen- mediated behavior. Gerbils were treated on the day of birth with OT, AVP, an OT receptor antagonist (OTA), an AVP receptor antagonist (AVPA), or saline. In adulthood, gerbils were treated with testosterone, an anti-androgen, or vehicle, and then exposed to a young pup. Preliminary results suggest that gerbils treated with neuropeptide agonists were more sensitive to androgen manipulations than gerbils treated with antagonists. Full data and final analyses are in preparation.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 3:15 PM Mar 6th, 3:30 PM

Sex Steroids, Neuropeptides, and Parental Behavior in Mongolian Gerbils

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

The willingness to respond to and care for offspring is dependent on a complex interaction between influences, and hormones can affect behavior via brain development, activation of existing systems, or a combination of both. Increases in parental behavior are often associated with or caused by concurrent decreases in testosterone, or increases in oxytocin(OT) and arginine vasopressin(AVP). Testosterone is necessary both during early development and at the onset of parenthood for neuropeptide receptor organization in the brain. Less is known though, about how neuropeptide levels during develop affect androgen receptor organization. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether levels of neuropeptides early in life influence androgen receptor development and subsequently, sensitivity to androgen mediated changes in spontaneous parental care. Specifically, we expected that if neuropeptide levels during early life affect androgen receptor development, then gerbils treated with OT or AVP receptor agonists will be more sensitive to androgen manipulations when expressing androgenmediated behavior, spontaneous parental care. In contrast, we also expect the gerbils treated with neuropeptide receptor antagonists will be less sensitive to androgen manipulations when expressing androgen- mediated behavior. Gerbils were treated on the day of birth with OT, AVP, an OT receptor antagonist (OTA), an AVP receptor antagonist (AVPA), or saline. In adulthood, gerbils were treated with testosterone, an anti-androgen, or vehicle, and then exposed to a young pup. Preliminary results suggest that gerbils treated with neuropeptide agonists were more sensitive to androgen manipulations than gerbils treated with antagonists. Full data and final analyses are in preparation.