Presentation Title

Putting Out Fires! Exploring Occupational Dispute Competence in the Workplace

Advisor Information

Lisa Scherer

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 249

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 9:45 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 10:00 AM

Abstract

Growing diversity in the workforce leading to an increasing number of disputes make hiring individuals who can work well with others and neutralize conflicts a priority. Although many organizations utilize a grievance or alternative dispute resolution system, the high costs associated with workplace conflict remain a prevalent problem. Occupational dispute competence, or an individual’s proficiency in deescalating and neutralizing disputes between and among others in the workplace, may help to address this need. The purpose of this exploratory study was to create and validate a scale to measure occupational dispute competence by examining relationships between occupational dispute competence and other traits associated with an individual’s ability to understand, interpret, and act upon emotions, such as emotional intelligence, workplace friendships, cognitive ability, and mindfulness. Results indicated that occupational dispute competence was related to emotional intelligence, cognitive ability, and the awareness dimension of mindfulness. Although occupational dispute competence was not a better predictor of workplace friendships than emotional intelligence alone, the absence of argumentation does not necessarily denote an abundance of friendly relationships at work. Thus, future studies should focus on occupational dispute competence as a predictor of outcomes more directly associated with a lack of conflict.

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Mar 6th, 9:45 AM Mar 6th, 10:00 AM

Putting Out Fires! Exploring Occupational Dispute Competence in the Workplace

UNO Criss Library, Room 249

Growing diversity in the workforce leading to an increasing number of disputes make hiring individuals who can work well with others and neutralize conflicts a priority. Although many organizations utilize a grievance or alternative dispute resolution system, the high costs associated with workplace conflict remain a prevalent problem. Occupational dispute competence, or an individual’s proficiency in deescalating and neutralizing disputes between and among others in the workplace, may help to address this need. The purpose of this exploratory study was to create and validate a scale to measure occupational dispute competence by examining relationships between occupational dispute competence and other traits associated with an individual’s ability to understand, interpret, and act upon emotions, such as emotional intelligence, workplace friendships, cognitive ability, and mindfulness. Results indicated that occupational dispute competence was related to emotional intelligence, cognitive ability, and the awareness dimension of mindfulness. Although occupational dispute competence was not a better predictor of workplace friendships than emotional intelligence alone, the absence of argumentation does not necessarily denote an abundance of friendly relationships at work. Thus, future studies should focus on occupational dispute competence as a predictor of outcomes more directly associated with a lack of conflict.