Presentation Title

Phonological profiles of 2-year-olds with expressive-only and expressive and receptive language delay

Advisor Information

Shari DeVeney

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 249

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 11:15 AM

Abstract

Late talkers compromise 10-15% of young children. They gain new words more slowly and begin combining words into phrases later than their typically developing peers. This language delay is associated with negative effects on reading and social skill development. Identification of predictive factors for continued language delay, including sound production skills, is important so that appropriate speech-language intervention can be directed. The purpose of this descriptive study is to investigate the phonetic inventories and percent of accurate consonant sound usage among late-talking toddlers. It is hypothesized that children with expressive and receptive language delays will have smaller phonetic inventories and lower percent consonants correct than toddlers with expressive-only language delay.

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Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 11:15 AM

Phonological profiles of 2-year-olds with expressive-only and expressive and receptive language delay

UNO Criss Library, Room 249

Late talkers compromise 10-15% of young children. They gain new words more slowly and begin combining words into phrases later than their typically developing peers. This language delay is associated with negative effects on reading and social skill development. Identification of predictive factors for continued language delay, including sound production skills, is important so that appropriate speech-language intervention can be directed. The purpose of this descriptive study is to investigate the phonetic inventories and percent of accurate consonant sound usage among late-talking toddlers. It is hypothesized that children with expressive and receptive language delays will have smaller phonetic inventories and lower percent consonants correct than toddlers with expressive-only language delay.