Presentation Title

Information and Communications Technology Development for Native American Small Businesses with a Community Emphasis

Advisor Information

Sajda Qureshi

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

6-3-2015 2:45 PM

Abstract

Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have often been touted as a means of enabling people to make their way out of poverty. Despite the high access and use of ICTs in the United States, high unemployment and poverty rates among Native Americans and African Americans continues to rise while deepening existing income inequalities. However, it is still unclear how these technologies are being used by African American and Native American entrepreneurs in the United States. Through a framing analysis of Native American and African American owned micro-entrepreneurs, this paper investigates the use of ICTs in six micro- enterprises that would enable this research question to be answered: What aspects of the digital divide are preventing micro-enterprises from sustaining themselves? Based on the data, the characteristics of ICTs, the access to ICTs, and personal inequalities could impact the direct effects of information provision and infrastructure development. We further conclude that the direct effects could lead to the economic development and empowerment. Findings reveal strong community and infrastructure frames in Native American micro-enterprises and their use of IT products and services for business and economic development. The African American micro-enterprises studied showed low levels of trust affecting their use of ICTs in their businesses. This addresses the gap in the literature requiring research between the relationship between ICTs and the development of Native American owned small businesses and adds to the literature on IT adoption.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 2:30 PM Mar 6th, 2:45 PM

Information and Communications Technology Development for Native American Small Businesses with a Community Emphasis

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have often been touted as a means of enabling people to make their way out of poverty. Despite the high access and use of ICTs in the United States, high unemployment and poverty rates among Native Americans and African Americans continues to rise while deepening existing income inequalities. However, it is still unclear how these technologies are being used by African American and Native American entrepreneurs in the United States. Through a framing analysis of Native American and African American owned micro-entrepreneurs, this paper investigates the use of ICTs in six micro- enterprises that would enable this research question to be answered: What aspects of the digital divide are preventing micro-enterprises from sustaining themselves? Based on the data, the characteristics of ICTs, the access to ICTs, and personal inequalities could impact the direct effects of information provision and infrastructure development. We further conclude that the direct effects could lead to the economic development and empowerment. Findings reveal strong community and infrastructure frames in Native American micro-enterprises and their use of IT products and services for business and economic development. The African American micro-enterprises studied showed low levels of trust affecting their use of ICTs in their businesses. This addresses the gap in the literature requiring research between the relationship between ICTs and the development of Native American owned small businesses and adds to the literature on IT adoption.