Presentation Title

Microglia Levels in Response to Chorda Tympani Transection in Developing Rats

Advisor Information

Suzanne Sollars

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 10:30 AM

Abstract

The chorda tympani nerve (CT) is one of the nerves responsible for relaying taste information from the oral cavity to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in the brainstem. Following transection of the CT (CTX), the resulting peripheral and central effects range from severe and permanent (in young rats) to mild and transient (in adult rats). The mechanisms driving these developmentally-dependent effects are unclear. A possible contributor is microglia, a primary component of the central immune response. Prior to the current study, no research has examined the microglia response to CTX in young rats and compared it to the response in adults. The current ongoing study utilizes immunohistochemistry to quantify the microglia response following CTX to determine if that response varies over the course of development. Rats aged 5, 10, 25, and 50 days are receiving unilateral CTX, and NTS microglia levels are evaluated four days later. As previous research indicates that microglia levels are typically higher in healthy younger mammals, it is hypothesized that the microglia response to CTX will be greater in the younger age conditions in comparison to the older animals. If this is the case, it will provide insight into a potential mechanism for the more severe central effects of CTX. Upon completion of this study, future research will be needed to elucidate the precise function of microglia in the developing taste system’s response to injury.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 9:00 AM Mar 6th, 10:30 AM

Microglia Levels in Response to Chorda Tympani Transection in Developing Rats

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The chorda tympani nerve (CT) is one of the nerves responsible for relaying taste information from the oral cavity to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in the brainstem. Following transection of the CT (CTX), the resulting peripheral and central effects range from severe and permanent (in young rats) to mild and transient (in adult rats). The mechanisms driving these developmentally-dependent effects are unclear. A possible contributor is microglia, a primary component of the central immune response. Prior to the current study, no research has examined the microglia response to CTX in young rats and compared it to the response in adults. The current ongoing study utilizes immunohistochemistry to quantify the microglia response following CTX to determine if that response varies over the course of development. Rats aged 5, 10, 25, and 50 days are receiving unilateral CTX, and NTS microglia levels are evaluated four days later. As previous research indicates that microglia levels are typically higher in healthy younger mammals, it is hypothesized that the microglia response to CTX will be greater in the younger age conditions in comparison to the older animals. If this is the case, it will provide insight into a potential mechanism for the more severe central effects of CTX. Upon completion of this study, future research will be needed to elucidate the precise function of microglia in the developing taste system’s response to injury.