Presentation Title

Aspects of the relationship context as an additional strategy of self-continuity: The roles of family and peers in emerging adults

Advisor Information

Jonathan Santo

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:30 PM

Abstract

Introduction: The approaches used by people to explain the stability of perceptions of self-continuity over time have been associated with indicators of mental health. However, the various strategies used during emerging adulthood have yet to be fully explored. Essentialism reflects how certain characteristics remaining the same serves as a strategy for self-continuity whereas narrativism uses the connectivity of the parts of the self-identity that are likely to change over time. The aim of the current project was to identify whether aspects of the relationship context are measurably distinct from other established strategies of self-continuity. Method: Data were collected from 309 emerging adults (75% female; mean age = 21.88 years, SD=4.84) from Omaha, Nebraska. Self-continuity strategies were assessed by asking participants how much they agreed with various statements that either reflected essentialism or narrativism and as a function of the context. Results: Structural equation model building began by first creating latent constructs of self-continuity and discontinuity. Next, we added latent factors for strategies of self-continuity, narrativism, essentialism and that of the context, regressing them on self-continuity. Not surprisingly, self-continuity was positively associated with narrativism, essentialism and context and was a good fit to the data. Conclusions: The results support the notion that self-continuity is positively associated with strategies of essentialism, narrativism and context. Moreover, the relationship context was measurably distinct from the other strategies of self-continuity. Future research should explore how these strategies bolster emerging adults’ cohesive sense of self and how these strategies protect against mental illness and substance abuse.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 12:30 PM

Aspects of the relationship context as an additional strategy of self-continuity: The roles of family and peers in emerging adults

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Introduction: The approaches used by people to explain the stability of perceptions of self-continuity over time have been associated with indicators of mental health. However, the various strategies used during emerging adulthood have yet to be fully explored. Essentialism reflects how certain characteristics remaining the same serves as a strategy for self-continuity whereas narrativism uses the connectivity of the parts of the self-identity that are likely to change over time. The aim of the current project was to identify whether aspects of the relationship context are measurably distinct from other established strategies of self-continuity. Method: Data were collected from 309 emerging adults (75% female; mean age = 21.88 years, SD=4.84) from Omaha, Nebraska. Self-continuity strategies were assessed by asking participants how much they agreed with various statements that either reflected essentialism or narrativism and as a function of the context. Results: Structural equation model building began by first creating latent constructs of self-continuity and discontinuity. Next, we added latent factors for strategies of self-continuity, narrativism, essentialism and that of the context, regressing them on self-continuity. Not surprisingly, self-continuity was positively associated with narrativism, essentialism and context and was a good fit to the data. Conclusions: The results support the notion that self-continuity is positively associated with strategies of essentialism, narrativism and context. Moreover, the relationship context was measurably distinct from the other strategies of self-continuity. Future research should explore how these strategies bolster emerging adults’ cohesive sense of self and how these strategies protect against mental illness and substance abuse.