Presentation Title

Septin regulation in Candida albicans

Advisor Information

Jill Blankenship

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 10:30 AM

Abstract

Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen that commonly causes oral and genital infections in humans. Hospital acquired infections by C.albicans and C.albicans biofilms on surfaces of implantable medical devices are of growing concern. Pathogenicity of the organism is dependent on its ability to change between yeast and filamentous form, fixation to epithelial and endothelial cells and synthesis of extracellular proteinases. The septin family of cytoskeletal filament-forming proteins has functions in cellular morphogenesis and cell surface events in eukaryotes. Septins were first identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and function at the bud neck by forming a scaffold to recruit other proteins. Septin regulation is still unclear in C.albicans. Septin localization using GFP tags in mutant strains would help understand regulation during filamentation or stress using genes known to affect those processes.

Comments

Winner of Outstanding Undergraduate Poster Presentation

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 9:00 AM Mar 6th, 10:30 AM

Septin regulation in Candida albicans

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen that commonly causes oral and genital infections in humans. Hospital acquired infections by C.albicans and C.albicans biofilms on surfaces of implantable medical devices are of growing concern. Pathogenicity of the organism is dependent on its ability to change between yeast and filamentous form, fixation to epithelial and endothelial cells and synthesis of extracellular proteinases. The septin family of cytoskeletal filament-forming proteins has functions in cellular morphogenesis and cell surface events in eukaryotes. Septins were first identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and function at the bud neck by forming a scaffold to recruit other proteins. Septin regulation is still unclear in C.albicans. Septin localization using GFP tags in mutant strains would help understand regulation during filamentation or stress using genes known to affect those processes.