Presentation Title

A comparison of baseline lower extremity muscle function differences in patients with PAD and healthy controls

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:30 PM

Abstract

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a disease that results from blockages in the lower extremity arteries and hinders blood flow to the legs. Functional limitations caused by PAD include a sedentary lifestyle, higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and reduced quality of life. Current research evaluating PAD muscular strength and function measure isometric strength, or the amount of torque generated by a joint in a fixed position. This is not representative of function through the full joint angle of motion or of muscular strength used during daily activities such as walking. Evaluating muscular strength and power the entire range of motion allows for further understanding of the muscular capacity. Electromyography (EMG) measures electrical activity within the muscle and is another way to quantify function of the muscles during physical activity. EMG will allow further understanding of how muscle damage documented in patients with PAD affects muscle function. One patient with PAD and six control subjects performed ankle plantar and dorsi flexion and hip extension and flexion on an isokinetic dynamometer while instrumented with EMG electrodes. Movements were performed at a constant speed of 120deg/s. Overall the patient with PAD had decreased torque and power measures for both hip and ankle joints compared to controls. Interestingly, muscle activity was decreased for the gastrocnemius but was increased for the soleus muscle for the patient with PAD. The reorganization of muscle function of the plantar flexors may be indicative of the muscle myopathy present in patients with PAD.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 12:30 PM

A comparison of baseline lower extremity muscle function differences in patients with PAD and healthy controls

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a disease that results from blockages in the lower extremity arteries and hinders blood flow to the legs. Functional limitations caused by PAD include a sedentary lifestyle, higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and reduced quality of life. Current research evaluating PAD muscular strength and function measure isometric strength, or the amount of torque generated by a joint in a fixed position. This is not representative of function through the full joint angle of motion or of muscular strength used during daily activities such as walking. Evaluating muscular strength and power the entire range of motion allows for further understanding of the muscular capacity. Electromyography (EMG) measures electrical activity within the muscle and is another way to quantify function of the muscles during physical activity. EMG will allow further understanding of how muscle damage documented in patients with PAD affects muscle function. One patient with PAD and six control subjects performed ankle plantar and dorsi flexion and hip extension and flexion on an isokinetic dynamometer while instrumented with EMG electrodes. Movements were performed at a constant speed of 120deg/s. Overall the patient with PAD had decreased torque and power measures for both hip and ankle joints compared to controls. Interestingly, muscle activity was decreased for the gastrocnemius but was increased for the soleus muscle for the patient with PAD. The reorganization of muscle function of the plantar flexors may be indicative of the muscle myopathy present in patients with PAD.