Presentation Title

Abnormal Breathing Strenghtens Locomotor Respiratory Coupling

Advisor Information

Jenna Yentes

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 10:30 AM

Abstract

Biological rhythms mutually attract to each other. Defined as coupling, locomotor and respiration rhythms in humans have been clearly identified during walking. We, specifically investigated the effect of involuntary abnormal breathing rhythms on the ability to couple the locomotor and respiratory systems to provide additional insight into the instruments behind this coupling. To measure coupling, three tools were utilized: frequency ratio, cross-correlation and cross recurrence quantification analysis (cRQA). Six patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and fourteen aged-matched controls were asked to walk on a treadmill for four minutes under a self-selected walking speed and speeds +/- 10% and +/-20% of their selfselected speed. Patients with COPD represent a population that has abnormal breathing patterns. Patients with COPD demonstrated a stricter range of frequency ratios that represented more rigid and less complex coupling. Changes in speed produced changes in in both groups, demonstrating that coupling is altered under different task demands. From a dynamic systems theory point-of-view, preferred performance in certain situations can be along a continuum of very rigid to very random and patients with COPD prefer a 1:1 or 2:1 coupling that is much tighter than their healthy counterparts, based on cRQA results. The findings of the current work should be expanded further in the future to investigate the possibility of using coupling as a rehabilitation tool and using COPD as a platform to understand the pathomechanics of locomotor respiratory coupling.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 9:00 AM Mar 6th, 10:30 AM

Abnormal Breathing Strenghtens Locomotor Respiratory Coupling

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Biological rhythms mutually attract to each other. Defined as coupling, locomotor and respiration rhythms in humans have been clearly identified during walking. We, specifically investigated the effect of involuntary abnormal breathing rhythms on the ability to couple the locomotor and respiratory systems to provide additional insight into the instruments behind this coupling. To measure coupling, three tools were utilized: frequency ratio, cross-correlation and cross recurrence quantification analysis (cRQA). Six patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and fourteen aged-matched controls were asked to walk on a treadmill for four minutes under a self-selected walking speed and speeds +/- 10% and +/-20% of their selfselected speed. Patients with COPD represent a population that has abnormal breathing patterns. Patients with COPD demonstrated a stricter range of frequency ratios that represented more rigid and less complex coupling. Changes in speed produced changes in in both groups, demonstrating that coupling is altered under different task demands. From a dynamic systems theory point-of-view, preferred performance in certain situations can be along a continuum of very rigid to very random and patients with COPD prefer a 1:1 or 2:1 coupling that is much tighter than their healthy counterparts, based on cRQA results. The findings of the current work should be expanded further in the future to investigate the possibility of using coupling as a rehabilitation tool and using COPD as a platform to understand the pathomechanics of locomotor respiratory coupling.