Presentation Title

A Theory of Ethical Concerns and Considerations in Crowdsourcing

Advisor Information

Gert-Jan de Vreede

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

6-3-2015 3:30 PM

Abstract

Recent research has had success identifying when novel words become integrated into the adult lexicon via the use of the prime lexicality effect (Qiao & Forster, 2013). Two primary steps in novel word lexicalization have been identified. During the first step, lexical configuration, one becomes familiar with the orthographic form of a word, its spelling, pronunciation, meaning and usage. Only after this has been completed can the cognitive representation of the word begin to interact with representations of other words in the lexicon and begin to become fully integrated into the semantic network (Leach & Samuels, 2007). So, as a person is learning a new word, it should begin by behaving in a non-word like fashion (i.e. show large length effects) then slowly begin to behave in a more “word like” fashion as it is lexicalized. The current project examined the length effect in naming as words became lexicalized. Participant studied obscure English words over four sessions. The length effect in naming was diminished as the study words were integrated into the vocabulary of participants, suggesting that the length effect is indeed caused by interactions between the cognitive representations of words. This result is consistent with the DRC model of visual word recognition, while PDP models have difficulty accounting for this effect. The prime lexicality effect however, was not evident in any session.

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Mar 6th, 2:00 PM Mar 6th, 3:30 PM

A Theory of Ethical Concerns and Considerations in Crowdsourcing

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Recent research has had success identifying when novel words become integrated into the adult lexicon via the use of the prime lexicality effect (Qiao & Forster, 2013). Two primary steps in novel word lexicalization have been identified. During the first step, lexical configuration, one becomes familiar with the orthographic form of a word, its spelling, pronunciation, meaning and usage. Only after this has been completed can the cognitive representation of the word begin to interact with representations of other words in the lexicon and begin to become fully integrated into the semantic network (Leach & Samuels, 2007). So, as a person is learning a new word, it should begin by behaving in a non-word like fashion (i.e. show large length effects) then slowly begin to behave in a more “word like” fashion as it is lexicalized. The current project examined the length effect in naming as words became lexicalized. Participant studied obscure English words over four sessions. The length effect in naming was diminished as the study words were integrated into the vocabulary of participants, suggesting that the length effect is indeed caused by interactions between the cognitive representations of words. This result is consistent with the DRC model of visual word recognition, while PDP models have difficulty accounting for this effect. The prime lexicality effect however, was not evident in any session.