Presentation Title

A Mediational Model of Relational Victimization and Depression in Bulimia

Advisor Information

Juan Casas

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 112

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-3-2015 2:45 PM

End Date

6-3-2015 3:00 PM

Abstract

A recent examination of disordered eating in college revealed students with eating disorders increased from 18.5% in 1995 to 30.5% in 2008 in both male and female students (White, Reynolds-Malear, & Cordero, 2011). Peer victimization (particularly relational victimization) has been positively associated with increases in disordered eating. Though a relationship is noted to exist between relational victimization and disordered eating, this relationship may be due in part to a third variable, depression. While it is noted that relational victimization does occur at college (Dahlen, Czar, Prather, and Dyess, 2013), recalled experiences of relational victimization may be considered particularly significant (Rosen, Underwood, Gentsch, Rahdar, Wharton, 2012). Risk factors for bulimia may differ for boys and girls. Therefore, the current study focused on the potential mediating role of depression between high school relational victimization and bulimia (controlling for college relational victimization and gender). College student participants completed retrospective and concurrent measures of relational victimization as well as assessments of current symptoms of bulimia and depression. Preliminary hierarchical regression analyses provided evidence for a potential partial mediation, however, follow-up bootstrapping supported a fully mediated model. That is, high school relational victimization had significant effect on bulimia, such that as high school relational victimization increased, bulimia also increased (controlling for gender and college relational victimization). Practical implications for eating disorder prevention programs are discussed.

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Mar 6th, 2:45 PM Mar 6th, 3:00 PM

A Mediational Model of Relational Victimization and Depression in Bulimia

UNO Criss Library, Room 112

A recent examination of disordered eating in college revealed students with eating disorders increased from 18.5% in 1995 to 30.5% in 2008 in both male and female students (White, Reynolds-Malear, & Cordero, 2011). Peer victimization (particularly relational victimization) has been positively associated with increases in disordered eating. Though a relationship is noted to exist between relational victimization and disordered eating, this relationship may be due in part to a third variable, depression. While it is noted that relational victimization does occur at college (Dahlen, Czar, Prather, and Dyess, 2013), recalled experiences of relational victimization may be considered particularly significant (Rosen, Underwood, Gentsch, Rahdar, Wharton, 2012). Risk factors for bulimia may differ for boys and girls. Therefore, the current study focused on the potential mediating role of depression between high school relational victimization and bulimia (controlling for college relational victimization and gender). College student participants completed retrospective and concurrent measures of relational victimization as well as assessments of current symptoms of bulimia and depression. Preliminary hierarchical regression analyses provided evidence for a potential partial mediation, however, follow-up bootstrapping supported a fully mediated model. That is, high school relational victimization had significant effect on bulimia, such that as high school relational victimization increased, bulimia also increased (controlling for gender and college relational victimization). Practical implications for eating disorder prevention programs are discussed.