Presentation Title

From the Baroque Musical Period (1600-1750) to the Music Faculty of UNO (2015): Music Teachers Passing the Art of Piano Pedagogy Through the Generations

Advisor Information

Barry Ford

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 10:30 AM

Abstract

As a keyboard performance major and instructor, I have seen how musical education is passed down from one teacher to another throughout the generations. My poster shows this common thread which connects a 425-year lineage of teachers, their famous contemporaries and the development of keyboard instruments from the end of the Renaissance period in 1589 to 2015, which includes my two piano instructors at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. I began this project by researching the teachers of my two piano instructors. Interestingly, after researching six publications, I discovered the musical ancestry of my teachers intersects at Carl Czerny (1791-1857) and can be traced back to 1589. I have added myself to the end of the list, which has become my “musical heritage tree”. I am continuing the tradition of training into the next generation of music students and contributing to this amazing legacy. When we see the brilliant musicians and instructors who have preceded us, we should be inspired to continue their legacy of excellence by promoting that same high standard in teaching and musical performance while also seeking to grow through continued education.

Comments

Winner of Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 9:00 AM Mar 6th, 10:30 AM

From the Baroque Musical Period (1600-1750) to the Music Faculty of UNO (2015): Music Teachers Passing the Art of Piano Pedagogy Through the Generations

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

As a keyboard performance major and instructor, I have seen how musical education is passed down from one teacher to another throughout the generations. My poster shows this common thread which connects a 425-year lineage of teachers, their famous contemporaries and the development of keyboard instruments from the end of the Renaissance period in 1589 to 2015, which includes my two piano instructors at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. I began this project by researching the teachers of my two piano instructors. Interestingly, after researching six publications, I discovered the musical ancestry of my teachers intersects at Carl Czerny (1791-1857) and can be traced back to 1589. I have added myself to the end of the list, which has become my “musical heritage tree”. I am continuing the tradition of training into the next generation of music students and contributing to this amazing legacy. When we see the brilliant musicians and instructors who have preceded us, we should be inspired to continue their legacy of excellence by promoting that same high standard in teaching and musical performance while also seeking to grow through continued education.