Presentation Title

The effect of the muscle biopsy procedure on blood flow and tissue oxygenation

Advisor Information

Dustin Slivka

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

6-3-2015 12:30 PM

Abstract

The percutaneous skeletal muscle biopsy has been shown to disrupt glycogenesis, possibly due changes in blood flow and thus nutrient delivery. PURPOSE: To determine the effects of the percutaneous skeletal muscle biopsy procedure on blood flow and tissue oxygen saturation. METHODS: Twelve recreationally active males (age: 25 ± 5 years; height: 178 ± 6 cm; weight: 86.8 ± 12.5 kg; body fat: 13.6 ± 6.6%) rested for 30 minutes before blood flow measurements were obtained from the common femoral artery of each leg using an ultrasound system (Terason t3000, Burlington, MA). This measurement was approximately 2-3 cm proximal to the artery’s bifurcation. Tissue oxygenation was collected from a skin surface site over the vastus lateralis, using near infrared spectroscopy (Inspectra StO2 Monitor; Hutchinson, MN). Following the initial measurement, a biopsy of the vastus lateralis was conducted followed by additional blood flow and tissue oxygenation measures. RESULTS: There was no effect of biopsy on femoral artery diameter (pre, 8.35 ± 0.45; post, 8.19 ± 0.42 mm; p = 0 .412), blood velocity (pre, 6.48 ± 0.66; post, 6.10 ± 0.66 cm · sec-1; p = 0.507), or flow volume (pre, 377 ± 62; post, 350 ± 64 ml · min-1; p = 0.415). Tissue oxygen saturation decreased from pre to post biopsy (pre, 69 ± 8 %: post, 61 ± 7 %; p = 0.0185). CONCLUSION: These data indicate that the skeletal muscle biopsy procedure does not impact blood flow, but does have an impact on tissue oxygen saturation.

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Mar 6th, 11:00 AM Mar 6th, 12:30 PM

The effect of the muscle biopsy procedure on blood flow and tissue oxygenation

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The percutaneous skeletal muscle biopsy has been shown to disrupt glycogenesis, possibly due changes in blood flow and thus nutrient delivery. PURPOSE: To determine the effects of the percutaneous skeletal muscle biopsy procedure on blood flow and tissue oxygen saturation. METHODS: Twelve recreationally active males (age: 25 ± 5 years; height: 178 ± 6 cm; weight: 86.8 ± 12.5 kg; body fat: 13.6 ± 6.6%) rested for 30 minutes before blood flow measurements were obtained from the common femoral artery of each leg using an ultrasound system (Terason t3000, Burlington, MA). This measurement was approximately 2-3 cm proximal to the artery’s bifurcation. Tissue oxygenation was collected from a skin surface site over the vastus lateralis, using near infrared spectroscopy (Inspectra StO2 Monitor; Hutchinson, MN). Following the initial measurement, a biopsy of the vastus lateralis was conducted followed by additional blood flow and tissue oxygenation measures. RESULTS: There was no effect of biopsy on femoral artery diameter (pre, 8.35 ± 0.45; post, 8.19 ± 0.42 mm; p = 0 .412), blood velocity (pre, 6.48 ± 0.66; post, 6.10 ± 0.66 cm · sec-1; p = 0.507), or flow volume (pre, 377 ± 62; post, 350 ± 64 ml · min-1; p = 0.415). Tissue oxygen saturation decreased from pre to post biopsy (pre, 69 ± 8 %: post, 61 ± 7 %; p = 0.0185). CONCLUSION: These data indicate that the skeletal muscle biopsy procedure does not impact blood flow, but does have an impact on tissue oxygen saturation.