Presentation Title

The Effect of Structured Rhythmic Auditory Stimuli on the Performance of a Repetitive Hammering Task

Advisor Information

Steven Harrison

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-3-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

6-3-2015 3:30 PM

Abstract

The ability to do the same task in multiple different ways makes a person flexible and therefore highly functional. In this sense, variability in how we perform a movement is part of its functionality. As people age, flexibility and therefore functionality decreases. This is reflected in age related changes in the “structure” of the motor variability. Evidence suggests that the structure of movement variability can be manipulated by creating auditory stimuli that have particular fractal variability structures. We are hoping to achieve a better understanding of the basis of motor flexibility from this project by asking participants to coordinate a simple hammering task to a variety of structured metronomes. To study the role of the complexity of the environment we had participants perform hammering motions without a metronome (no metronome condition), to a metronome that has no variability (metronome condition), to a metronome that has unstructured variability (white noise condition), and to a metronome that has fractal variability (pink noise condition). We found that we were able to manipulate the variability structure of participants hammering motions using the different stimuli. In the future if we are able to better understand motor flexibility we will be able to gain insights into the conditions that support adaptable behavior. In addition, if we are able to understand all of these things, it may provide new insight for rehabilitation.

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COinS
 
Mar 6th, 2:00 PM Mar 6th, 3:30 PM

The Effect of Structured Rhythmic Auditory Stimuli on the Performance of a Repetitive Hammering Task

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The ability to do the same task in multiple different ways makes a person flexible and therefore highly functional. In this sense, variability in how we perform a movement is part of its functionality. As people age, flexibility and therefore functionality decreases. This is reflected in age related changes in the “structure” of the motor variability. Evidence suggests that the structure of movement variability can be manipulated by creating auditory stimuli that have particular fractal variability structures. We are hoping to achieve a better understanding of the basis of motor flexibility from this project by asking participants to coordinate a simple hammering task to a variety of structured metronomes. To study the role of the complexity of the environment we had participants perform hammering motions without a metronome (no metronome condition), to a metronome that has no variability (metronome condition), to a metronome that has unstructured variability (white noise condition), and to a metronome that has fractal variability (pink noise condition). We found that we were able to manipulate the variability structure of participants hammering motions using the different stimuli. In the future if we are able to better understand motor flexibility we will be able to gain insights into the conditions that support adaptable behavior. In addition, if we are able to understand all of these things, it may provide new insight for rehabilitation.