Presentation Title

Effect of Pre-Meeting Talk on Group Performance

Advisor Information

Joseph Allen

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 10:30 AM

Abstract

The interactions that occur prior to a meeting, both behavioral and verbal, constitute pre-meeting talk (PMT). Based on past research, the present studied investigated the relationship between PMT and aspects of group performance. Previous studies suggest that the initial statements in a group setting have a disproportionately high impact on all subsequent conversation, and emotional contagion research suggests that positive affect that leads to the building of rapport, cohesiveness, and cooperation in a group, which can ultimately allow that group to communicate their ideas and understand each other more effectively. In this study, there were 68 meeting groups comprised of undergraduate students that were recruited via an online research participation system. Participants took part in a meeting regarding changes to general education curriculum requirements, and their interactions both prior to and during the meeting were video recorded. Their conversations were then coded into sense units and classified by the PMT and act4teams coding scheme for the PMT and meeting periods, respectively. The central hypotheses positing a positive relationship between PMT and aspects of group performance did not receive support. However, a variety of additional, more complex analyses have been pursued, resulting in some very intriguing findings that merit further exploration. Implications, limitations, and avenues for future research are discussed. Additional analyses of the present data may reveal implications for meeting leaders as they seek to improve meeting outcomes.

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Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:30 AM

Effect of Pre-Meeting Talk on Group Performance

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The interactions that occur prior to a meeting, both behavioral and verbal, constitute pre-meeting talk (PMT). Based on past research, the present studied investigated the relationship between PMT and aspects of group performance. Previous studies suggest that the initial statements in a group setting have a disproportionately high impact on all subsequent conversation, and emotional contagion research suggests that positive affect that leads to the building of rapport, cohesiveness, and cooperation in a group, which can ultimately allow that group to communicate their ideas and understand each other more effectively. In this study, there were 68 meeting groups comprised of undergraduate students that were recruited via an online research participation system. Participants took part in a meeting regarding changes to general education curriculum requirements, and their interactions both prior to and during the meeting were video recorded. Their conversations were then coded into sense units and classified by the PMT and act4teams coding scheme for the PMT and meeting periods, respectively. The central hypotheses positing a positive relationship between PMT and aspects of group performance did not receive support. However, a variety of additional, more complex analyses have been pursued, resulting in some very intriguing findings that merit further exploration. Implications, limitations, and avenues for future research are discussed. Additional analyses of the present data may reveal implications for meeting leaders as they seek to improve meeting outcomes.