Presentation Title

Effects of Exercise in Hot and Cold Environments on Interleukin-6

Advisor Information

Dustin Slivka

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 10:30 AM

Abstract

An effective method to treat and prevent a multitude of chronic diseases is to reduce chronic inflammation through regular exercise. The anti-inflammatory effect of exercise is predominantly due to the production of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) from the active skeletal musculature. Heat alone produces an inflammatory effect. However, the effect of IL-6 when exercising in different environmental conditions is currently unknown. Purpose: Determine the effects of exercise in hot, room temperature, and cold environments on plasma IL-6. Methods: Eleven recreationally trained males (n = 11, age = 24 ± 4 y, height = 178 ± 5 cm, weight = 79.4 ± 13.5 kg, 14.7% body fat, VO2 peak = 4.29 ± 0.86 L • min-1, Wmax 277 ± 41 W) performed a 1 h cycling bout in hot (H), room temperature (RT), and cold (C) environments (7°C, 20°C, 33°C, respectively). Participants recovered in a supine position for 3 h at room temperature. Blood samples were obtained from the antecubital vein pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise, and 3 h after exercise. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma concentrations of IL-6 using an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit. Results: Plasma IL-6 concentrations significantly increased immediately post-exercise and 3 h post-exercise compared to pre-exercise regardless of trial (14.8 ± 1.6 pg/mL, p = 0.008; 14.8 ± 0.9 pg/mL, p = 0.018; 11.4 ± 2.4 pg/mL, respectively). There were no differences in plasma IL-6 concentrations (p = 0.207) between H, C, and RT. Conclusions: The temperature in which exercise occurs does not affect acute plasma IL-6 response.

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Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:30 AM

Effects of Exercise in Hot and Cold Environments on Interleukin-6

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

An effective method to treat and prevent a multitude of chronic diseases is to reduce chronic inflammation through regular exercise. The anti-inflammatory effect of exercise is predominantly due to the production of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) from the active skeletal musculature. Heat alone produces an inflammatory effect. However, the effect of IL-6 when exercising in different environmental conditions is currently unknown. Purpose: Determine the effects of exercise in hot, room temperature, and cold environments on plasma IL-6. Methods: Eleven recreationally trained males (n = 11, age = 24 ± 4 y, height = 178 ± 5 cm, weight = 79.4 ± 13.5 kg, 14.7% body fat, VO2 peak = 4.29 ± 0.86 L • min-1, Wmax 277 ± 41 W) performed a 1 h cycling bout in hot (H), room temperature (RT), and cold (C) environments (7°C, 20°C, 33°C, respectively). Participants recovered in a supine position for 3 h at room temperature. Blood samples were obtained from the antecubital vein pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise, and 3 h after exercise. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma concentrations of IL-6 using an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit. Results: Plasma IL-6 concentrations significantly increased immediately post-exercise and 3 h post-exercise compared to pre-exercise regardless of trial (14.8 ± 1.6 pg/mL, p = 0.008; 14.8 ± 0.9 pg/mL, p = 0.018; 11.4 ± 2.4 pg/mL, respectively). There were no differences in plasma IL-6 concentrations (p = 0.207) between H, C, and RT. Conclusions: The temperature in which exercise occurs does not affect acute plasma IL-6 response.