Presentation Title

Frequency Validation of a high-bandwidth vibrotactile transducer for clinical use

Advisor Information

Kota Takahashi

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 12:15 PM

Abstract

Persons with transtibial amputation suffer from attenuated or absent tactile feedback from of their limb, due to the natural sensory loss resulting from amputation or neuropathic disability. The application of sub-threshold stochastic vibration has been shown to increase detection thresholds at the extremities of individuals with neuropathy. We hypothesize that adaptability in transtibial amputees during standing balance and locomotion will improve in the presence of a biologically friendly sub-threshold stimulation via 1/f socket vibration. We developed a system which uses a high-bandwidth vibrotactile transducer (Haptuator, Tactile Labs Inc., Montreal, Canada), which outputs two different frequency spectra: (1) Stochastic (white noise) vibration with a flat frequency spectrum, and (2) 1/f frequency spectrum (pink noise) with greater proportion of lower frequency oscillations. In this study we sought to validate the vibrotactile transducer by verifying the frequency content of the vibration. We attached an accelerometer to the haptuator, while delivering 3 types of vibration signals: white, pink and sinusoidal. We performed frequency analysis to investigate the recorded signals. The outcome data indicated that we succeeded in producing white but not pink noise. Our next step is to focus on how we will change out system to exhibit pink noise.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:15 PM

Frequency Validation of a high-bandwidth vibrotactile transducer for clinical use

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Persons with transtibial amputation suffer from attenuated or absent tactile feedback from of their limb, due to the natural sensory loss resulting from amputation or neuropathic disability. The application of sub-threshold stochastic vibration has been shown to increase detection thresholds at the extremities of individuals with neuropathy. We hypothesize that adaptability in transtibial amputees during standing balance and locomotion will improve in the presence of a biologically friendly sub-threshold stimulation via 1/f socket vibration. We developed a system which uses a high-bandwidth vibrotactile transducer (Haptuator, Tactile Labs Inc., Montreal, Canada), which outputs two different frequency spectra: (1) Stochastic (white noise) vibration with a flat frequency spectrum, and (2) 1/f frequency spectrum (pink noise) with greater proportion of lower frequency oscillations. In this study we sought to validate the vibrotactile transducer by verifying the frequency content of the vibration. We attached an accelerometer to the haptuator, while delivering 3 types of vibration signals: white, pink and sinusoidal. We performed frequency analysis to investigate the recorded signals. The outcome data indicated that we succeeded in producing white but not pink noise. Our next step is to focus on how we will change out system to exhibit pink noise.