Presentation Title

Attitudes Towards Problem Solving

Advisor Information

Roni Reiter-Palmon

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 4:00 PM

Abstract

This study investigated whether fixed and malleable creative mindsets predict creativity controlling for goal orientation and whether creative mindsets predict creativity at three different levels: everyday creativity (little-c creativity), creativity gained over time through experience (Pro-c creativity), and high-level creative achievements (Big-C creativity). The findings of this study support the notion that creativity level and type of creative task is an important consideration when investigating the effects of creative mindsets on creativity. Participants were 157 undergraduate students at UNO (119 females, 36 males, and two undisclosed). I found that malleable mindsets were positively related to mastery goal orientation, creative self-efficacy, Big-C, measures of Pro-c, and little-c creativity. Fixed creative mindsets were negatively related to performance-avoid goal orientation, creative self-efficacy, and some measures of Pro-c. However, while creative mindsets predicted creative performance controlling for goal orientation with one measure of Pro-c, they failed to add unique variance in creative performance in other measures of creativity. This study extended the nomological net of creative mindsets by investigating how creative mindsets predicted creativity while controlling for goal orientation or implicit theories of general ability. In essence, just because someone holds a strong malleable view of their creativity at the little-c level, this does not mean they hold the same view of their creativity when it comes to other levels of creativity. As organizations continue to recognize the importance of creativity, assessing employee mindsets of their creative ability can be used as a selection tool for choosing employees who will engage in creative initiatives.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 4th, 2:30 PM Mar 4th, 4:00 PM

Attitudes Towards Problem Solving

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

This study investigated whether fixed and malleable creative mindsets predict creativity controlling for goal orientation and whether creative mindsets predict creativity at three different levels: everyday creativity (little-c creativity), creativity gained over time through experience (Pro-c creativity), and high-level creative achievements (Big-C creativity). The findings of this study support the notion that creativity level and type of creative task is an important consideration when investigating the effects of creative mindsets on creativity. Participants were 157 undergraduate students at UNO (119 females, 36 males, and two undisclosed). I found that malleable mindsets were positively related to mastery goal orientation, creative self-efficacy, Big-C, measures of Pro-c, and little-c creativity. Fixed creative mindsets were negatively related to performance-avoid goal orientation, creative self-efficacy, and some measures of Pro-c. However, while creative mindsets predicted creative performance controlling for goal orientation with one measure of Pro-c, they failed to add unique variance in creative performance in other measures of creativity. This study extended the nomological net of creative mindsets by investigating how creative mindsets predicted creativity while controlling for goal orientation or implicit theories of general ability. In essence, just because someone holds a strong malleable view of their creativity at the little-c level, this does not mean they hold the same view of their creativity when it comes to other levels of creativity. As organizations continue to recognize the importance of creativity, assessing employee mindsets of their creative ability can be used as a selection tool for choosing employees who will engage in creative initiatives.