Presentation Title

Gait biomechanics are not improved following supervised treadmill exercise in patients with peripheral arterial disease

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 12:15 PM

Abstract

Pain, tingling, or numbness in the calves, thighs, and/or buttocks caused by physical activity is called intermittent claudication (IC). IC is the primary symptom of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) that occurs because blockages in the lower extremity arteries hinder blood flow to the legs. Current treatment for patients with PAD consists of supervised treadmill walking exercise (STW). After STW, patients with PAD exhibit improvement in maximum walking distances, but little is known regarding changes in gait biomechanics. This study determined the effectiveness of STW on gait biomechanics and lower extremity strength in patients with PAD. Fifteen patients completed five overground trials while kinematic (60 Hz; Motion Analysis Corp., USA) and kinetic (600 Hz; Kistler Instruments, USA) data were captured at the patient’s self-selected speed. Absolute claudication distance following the graded treadmill protocol was assessed, as was, peak plantar-flexor strength during isometric contractions (Biodex Medical Systems, USA). Peak joint torques and powers for the ankle, knee, and hip were calculated via inverse dynamics (Visual 3D, C-Motion, Inc., USA). In agreement with the previous literature, absolute claudication distance significantly increased post STW. No significant differences between baseline and post STW were detected for joint torques and powers, or for lower extremity strength. STW improves the maximum distance patients with PAD can walk through mechanisms other than improved gait and plantar-flexor muscle strength. Functional training in addition to STW may result in better gait mechanics and muscle strength, which could potentially lead to even greater improvements in walking performance for patients with PAD.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:15 PM

Gait biomechanics are not improved following supervised treadmill exercise in patients with peripheral arterial disease

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Pain, tingling, or numbness in the calves, thighs, and/or buttocks caused by physical activity is called intermittent claudication (IC). IC is the primary symptom of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) that occurs because blockages in the lower extremity arteries hinder blood flow to the legs. Current treatment for patients with PAD consists of supervised treadmill walking exercise (STW). After STW, patients with PAD exhibit improvement in maximum walking distances, but little is known regarding changes in gait biomechanics. This study determined the effectiveness of STW on gait biomechanics and lower extremity strength in patients with PAD. Fifteen patients completed five overground trials while kinematic (60 Hz; Motion Analysis Corp., USA) and kinetic (600 Hz; Kistler Instruments, USA) data were captured at the patient’s self-selected speed. Absolute claudication distance following the graded treadmill protocol was assessed, as was, peak plantar-flexor strength during isometric contractions (Biodex Medical Systems, USA). Peak joint torques and powers for the ankle, knee, and hip were calculated via inverse dynamics (Visual 3D, C-Motion, Inc., USA). In agreement with the previous literature, absolute claudication distance significantly increased post STW. No significant differences between baseline and post STW were detected for joint torques and powers, or for lower extremity strength. STW improves the maximum distance patients with PAD can walk through mechanisms other than improved gait and plantar-flexor muscle strength. Functional training in addition to STW may result in better gait mechanics and muscle strength, which could potentially lead to even greater improvements in walking performance for patients with PAD.