Presentation Title

Integrating Irish Pedegogy in the Elementary Music Classroom

Advisor Information

Christine Beard

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 10:30 AM

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to apply Irish pedagogical techniques to American elementary music classroom. In Fall, 2015, I completed my music education requirements through a semester of clinical practice. As a result of my intensive study of Irish music study, I created a series of lesson plans that use Irish music. Irish folk music is predominantly taught by rote. This means it has been passed down from teacher to student by listening and learning. While the melodies of many Irish tunes are written, there are many embellishments and ornamentation which are added to the basic Irish music that cannot be understood solely through printed music. The only way to learn these is to be taught by rote. According to Irish flute and Tin Whistle specialist, Grey Larsen, “In Ireland, and in Irish communities outside Ireland, many musicians learn their music largely by immersion, the way that we all master our native languages.” Although rote teaching is part of any classroom, elementary aged students, especially, will benefit from my lessons based on traditional Irish music by learning from a culture that may be different from theirs. It is important to incorporate history and culture in any classroom, especially in music. According to the National Standards of Music, the standards emphasize conceptual understanding in areas that reflect the actual processes in which musicians engage. The standards cultivate a student’s ability to carry out the three Artistic Processes of creating, performing, and responding. MU:Re7.2.8b states that students will “Identify and compare the context of programs of music from a variety of genres, cultures, and historical periods.” As stated above, the finished product of my project is a series of lessons based on my research and experience at the summer school in Ireland. These plans contain lessons and activities learned from the Donegal School of Traditional Music, held in Donegal, Ireland from June 1 through June 5, 2015. In Ireland, I observed contrasting styles of teaching that will add a differentiated style of teaching and educational techniques that may not be used in American classrooms. This will benefit my own style of teaching and curriculum when I become a full time teacher. As part of this class, I studied tin whistle and bodhran during my time in Ireland. Respectively, these instruments will be transferred to these common American instruments: modern flute, recorder, and hand drum. With the exception of the modern flute, these instruments are easily affordable and are commonly found in the elementary music classroom. Learning music by rote influences memory and engages a part of the brain that stimulates memory and comprehension. This mental workout could translate to any activity, task or future skill or curricular area.

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Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:30 AM

Integrating Irish Pedegogy in the Elementary Music Classroom

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The purpose of this project was to apply Irish pedagogical techniques to American elementary music classroom. In Fall, 2015, I completed my music education requirements through a semester of clinical practice. As a result of my intensive study of Irish music study, I created a series of lesson plans that use Irish music. Irish folk music is predominantly taught by rote. This means it has been passed down from teacher to student by listening and learning. While the melodies of many Irish tunes are written, there are many embellishments and ornamentation which are added to the basic Irish music that cannot be understood solely through printed music. The only way to learn these is to be taught by rote. According to Irish flute and Tin Whistle specialist, Grey Larsen, “In Ireland, and in Irish communities outside Ireland, many musicians learn their music largely by immersion, the way that we all master our native languages.” Although rote teaching is part of any classroom, elementary aged students, especially, will benefit from my lessons based on traditional Irish music by learning from a culture that may be different from theirs. It is important to incorporate history and culture in any classroom, especially in music. According to the National Standards of Music, the standards emphasize conceptual understanding in areas that reflect the actual processes in which musicians engage. The standards cultivate a student’s ability to carry out the three Artistic Processes of creating, performing, and responding. MU:Re7.2.8b states that students will “Identify and compare the context of programs of music from a variety of genres, cultures, and historical periods.” As stated above, the finished product of my project is a series of lessons based on my research and experience at the summer school in Ireland. These plans contain lessons and activities learned from the Donegal School of Traditional Music, held in Donegal, Ireland from June 1 through June 5, 2015. In Ireland, I observed contrasting styles of teaching that will add a differentiated style of teaching and educational techniques that may not be used in American classrooms. This will benefit my own style of teaching and curriculum when I become a full time teacher. As part of this class, I studied tin whistle and bodhran during my time in Ireland. Respectively, these instruments will be transferred to these common American instruments: modern flute, recorder, and hand drum. With the exception of the modern flute, these instruments are easily affordable and are commonly found in the elementary music classroom. Learning music by rote influences memory and engages a part of the brain that stimulates memory and comprehension. This mental workout could translate to any activity, task or future skill or curricular area.