Presentation Title

The relationship between perceived health outcomes and gait improvement following surgical intervention in peripheral arterial disease

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 12:15 PM

Abstract

Health attitudes regarding quality of life and functional recovery are related to improvement in some pathological groups. Patients with peripheral artery disease experience reduced quality of life and physical function from insufficient leg blood flow and walking-induced pain known as claudication. The standard treatment to improve blood flow in patients with PAD is surgery, but it is unknown how perceived health status prior to surgery influences outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between perceived health status and improvement in gait biomechanics and maximum walking distances following surgery. If perceived health status is positively related with improvement, programs could be developed to inform patients of potential for improved outcomes. Twenty-seven subjects were evaluated at baseline and six months post revascularization. Perceived health outcomes were assessed using the Walking Impairment Questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 Healthy Survey. Functional outcomes were assessed by measuring gait biomechanics and maximum walking distances. Pearson’s correlations were used to determine the strength, direction, and significance of relationships between perceived health status variables and gait outcome variables. Significant, moderate, relationships were found for seven comparisons using Pearson’s correlations. The directions indicate that patients with fewer perceived physical limitations, improved less in gait outcomes. However, patients with poor perceived social and general health at baseline showed increases in absolute walking distances. This outcome could be the result of patients with poor perceived health having greater room for improvement from surgical revascularization than those with few perceived physical limitations.

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Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:15 PM

The relationship between perceived health outcomes and gait improvement following surgical intervention in peripheral arterial disease

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Health attitudes regarding quality of life and functional recovery are related to improvement in some pathological groups. Patients with peripheral artery disease experience reduced quality of life and physical function from insufficient leg blood flow and walking-induced pain known as claudication. The standard treatment to improve blood flow in patients with PAD is surgery, but it is unknown how perceived health status prior to surgery influences outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between perceived health status and improvement in gait biomechanics and maximum walking distances following surgery. If perceived health status is positively related with improvement, programs could be developed to inform patients of potential for improved outcomes. Twenty-seven subjects were evaluated at baseline and six months post revascularization. Perceived health outcomes were assessed using the Walking Impairment Questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 Healthy Survey. Functional outcomes were assessed by measuring gait biomechanics and maximum walking distances. Pearson’s correlations were used to determine the strength, direction, and significance of relationships between perceived health status variables and gait outcome variables. Significant, moderate, relationships were found for seven comparisons using Pearson’s correlations. The directions indicate that patients with fewer perceived physical limitations, improved less in gait outcomes. However, patients with poor perceived social and general health at baseline showed increases in absolute walking distances. This outcome could be the result of patients with poor perceived health having greater room for improvement from surgical revascularization than those with few perceived physical limitations.