Presentation Title

Comparison of Polygonal Fault Architecture in Great Plains Chalk vs European Chalk

Advisor Information

Harmon Maher

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 12:15 PM

Abstract

We report on a work in progress that aims to develop a secure and efficient method for key exchange in wireless sensor networks. The keys exchanged will then be used for secure communication between sensors. The sensor nodes must maintain battery life for long periods of time while still providing full functionality. One way to extend battery life is to reduce CPU usage of the sensors. The proposed method to reduce CPU usage is to implement a matrix based key exchange algorithm. Currently many sensors use a public key exchange which requires heavy exponentiation. The matrix based key exchange does not require exponentiation and will therefore extend battery life. The project currently is in the pre-deployment stage which involves establishing a symmetric matrix as a product of two other matrices. Once the matrices are established and assigned, simulations will be run to determine CPU usage and be compared to that of a public key exchange. Simulating the key exchange prior to deployment will help in determining the efficiency of the algorithm and will be compared to public key exchange. Currently the comparison is done between the matrix based key exchange algorithm in Sage and the Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman key exchange algorithm, also in Sage. If the matrix based key exchange is more energy efficient than a public key exchange, it can be used within wireless sensor networks. Using a more efficient algorithm will save energy spent on CPU capabilities and still provide the essential encryption.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:15 PM

Comparison of Polygonal Fault Architecture in Great Plains Chalk vs European Chalk

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

We report on a work in progress that aims to develop a secure and efficient method for key exchange in wireless sensor networks. The keys exchanged will then be used for secure communication between sensors. The sensor nodes must maintain battery life for long periods of time while still providing full functionality. One way to extend battery life is to reduce CPU usage of the sensors. The proposed method to reduce CPU usage is to implement a matrix based key exchange algorithm. Currently many sensors use a public key exchange which requires heavy exponentiation. The matrix based key exchange does not require exponentiation and will therefore extend battery life. The project currently is in the pre-deployment stage which involves establishing a symmetric matrix as a product of two other matrices. Once the matrices are established and assigned, simulations will be run to determine CPU usage and be compared to that of a public key exchange. Simulating the key exchange prior to deployment will help in determining the efficiency of the algorithm and will be compared to public key exchange. Currently the comparison is done between the matrix based key exchange algorithm in Sage and the Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman key exchange algorithm, also in Sage. If the matrix based key exchange is more energy efficient than a public key exchange, it can be used within wireless sensor networks. Using a more efficient algorithm will save energy spent on CPU capabilities and still provide the essential encryption.