Presentation Title

Computational analysis of HLA types and HLA expression in human cancer

Advisor Information

Dario Ghersi

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2016 10:15 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 10:30 AM

Abstract

Cancer is defined as altered cells that have escaped normal growth regulation mechanisms. The mutated proteins that are associated with cancer can be detected as a foreign body by the immune system, which can then eliminate the cells that harbor those mutations. In fact, evidence is rapidly accumulating that the immune system does indeed contribute to the body’s multilayered defenses against tumors. The big question is how the immune system can also recognize cancer cells as foreign agents and proceed to eliminate them. The difficulties associated with establishing this type of anti-cancer defense are apparent from the outset: the immune system is organized to recognize and eliminate foreign agents from the body while leaving the body’s own tissue unmolested. Cancer cells, however, are native to the body and are, in many respects, indistinguishable from the body’s normal cells. A critical component of the immune response against cancer cells involves an important class of molecules known as the HLA system, which is highly diverse in the human population. A deeper understanding of the type and expression levels of HLA molecules in human cancers could help find appropriate vaccination strategies at a personalized level. To address these questions, we use large-scale cancer datasets that are publicly available, and we employ computational tools to predict the HLA type and calculate the expression levels.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:15 AM Mar 4th, 10:30 AM

Computational analysis of HLA types and HLA expression in human cancer

UNO Criss Library, Room 225

Cancer is defined as altered cells that have escaped normal growth regulation mechanisms. The mutated proteins that are associated with cancer can be detected as a foreign body by the immune system, which can then eliminate the cells that harbor those mutations. In fact, evidence is rapidly accumulating that the immune system does indeed contribute to the body’s multilayered defenses against tumors. The big question is how the immune system can also recognize cancer cells as foreign agents and proceed to eliminate them. The difficulties associated with establishing this type of anti-cancer defense are apparent from the outset: the immune system is organized to recognize and eliminate foreign agents from the body while leaving the body’s own tissue unmolested. Cancer cells, however, are native to the body and are, in many respects, indistinguishable from the body’s normal cells. A critical component of the immune response against cancer cells involves an important class of molecules known as the HLA system, which is highly diverse in the human population. A deeper understanding of the type and expression levels of HLA molecules in human cancers could help find appropriate vaccination strategies at a personalized level. To address these questions, we use large-scale cancer datasets that are publicly available, and we employ computational tools to predict the HLA type and calculate the expression levels.