Presentation Title

Gender differences in the moderating effect of proactive aggression in relation to physical and relational aggression and narcissism

Advisor Information

Jonathan Santo

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 12:45 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 2:15 PM

Abstract

Rationale: Physical and relational aggression have been suggested to predict narcissism through the manipulation of social relationships, such as spreading rumors or inflicting physical harm on an individual. Proactively aggressive males tend to be viewed as leaders by their peers, whereas, females who are proactively aggressive have been viewed as more manipulative. The current study aimed to capture how physical and relational aggression predict narcissism and the differences between genders, as well as how proactive aggression moderate the relationship between those variables. Methods: Participants consisted of 430 early adolescent children. Using a class roster, participants completed unlimited peer nominations measures of perceived narcissism, physical, and relational aggression. Homeroom teachers also provided ratings of each child on proactive aggression. Analyses were conducted using multigroup comparisons in structural equation modeling. Results: Model building began with a latent factor of narcissism as the dependent variable and using physical and relational aggression as predictors. Teacher rated proactive aggression was used as a moderator. Though there was no main effect of proactive aggression, both physical and relational aggression were positively associated with narcissism. The final model revealed that the moderating effect of proactive aggression was different between boys and girls (figure 1). For girls, physical aggression was a stronger predictor of narcissism for those high in proactive aggression, meanwhile for boys, physical aggression was a stronger predictor of narcissism for those low in proactive aggression. Discussion (based on remaining word count): These results provided further support of the previous literature indicating that physical and relational aggression are positively associated with narcissism.

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Mar 4th, 12:45 PM Mar 4th, 2:15 PM

Gender differences in the moderating effect of proactive aggression in relation to physical and relational aggression and narcissism

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Rationale: Physical and relational aggression have been suggested to predict narcissism through the manipulation of social relationships, such as spreading rumors or inflicting physical harm on an individual. Proactively aggressive males tend to be viewed as leaders by their peers, whereas, females who are proactively aggressive have been viewed as more manipulative. The current study aimed to capture how physical and relational aggression predict narcissism and the differences between genders, as well as how proactive aggression moderate the relationship between those variables. Methods: Participants consisted of 430 early adolescent children. Using a class roster, participants completed unlimited peer nominations measures of perceived narcissism, physical, and relational aggression. Homeroom teachers also provided ratings of each child on proactive aggression. Analyses were conducted using multigroup comparisons in structural equation modeling. Results: Model building began with a latent factor of narcissism as the dependent variable and using physical and relational aggression as predictors. Teacher rated proactive aggression was used as a moderator. Though there was no main effect of proactive aggression, both physical and relational aggression were positively associated with narcissism. The final model revealed that the moderating effect of proactive aggression was different between boys and girls (figure 1). For girls, physical aggression was a stronger predictor of narcissism for those high in proactive aggression, meanwhile for boys, physical aggression was a stronger predictor of narcissism for those low in proactive aggression. Discussion (based on remaining word count): These results provided further support of the previous literature indicating that physical and relational aggression are positively associated with narcissism.