Presentation Title

Retaining Volunteers: Meaningfulness as a Personal Resource for Employed Mothers

Advisor Information

Joseph Allen

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 12:45 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 2:15 PM

Abstract

Although the volunteer rates for both men and women are at the lowest point since 2002, women continue to volunteer at a higher rate than men across all age groups and education levels (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014). Volunteers serving in youth development organizations in particular are comprised primarily of women with children, highlighting the importance of examining specific drivers of women’s volunteer retention. This study utilized the JD-R model to examine work-to-volunteer conflict as a predictor of volunteer intentions to quit through burnout in a sample of working mother volunteers. Work-to-volunteer conflict was found to be indirectly related to employed women’s volunteer turnover through burnout. Additionally, results indicated that meaningfulness moderated the effects of work-to-volunteer conflict on burnout and intentions to quit.

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Mar 4th, 12:45 PM Mar 4th, 2:15 PM

Retaining Volunteers: Meaningfulness as a Personal Resource for Employed Mothers

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Although the volunteer rates for both men and women are at the lowest point since 2002, women continue to volunteer at a higher rate than men across all age groups and education levels (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014). Volunteers serving in youth development organizations in particular are comprised primarily of women with children, highlighting the importance of examining specific drivers of women’s volunteer retention. This study utilized the JD-R model to examine work-to-volunteer conflict as a predictor of volunteer intentions to quit through burnout in a sample of working mother volunteers. Work-to-volunteer conflict was found to be indirectly related to employed women’s volunteer turnover through burnout. Additionally, results indicated that meaningfulness moderated the effects of work-to-volunteer conflict on burnout and intentions to quit.