Presentation Title

Interaction Between the Chorda Tympani and Lingual Nerve in the Brainstem

Advisor Information

Suzanne Sollars

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 12:45 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 2:15 PM

Abstract

Gustatory information is transmitted from the tongue to a brainstem area called the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) via taste fibers. The chorda tympani nerve (CT) transmits gustatory (sweet, salty, sour, bitter) information via taste buds in fungiform papillae. The lingual nerve transmits somatosensory information (hot, cold, spicy, menthol) from papillae tissue that surrounds the taste buds. The CT contacts taste buds directly, while the lingual nerve makes contact with papillae, but not taste buds. Lingual nerve cuts (LX) lead to morphological changes to both lingual-innervated fungiform papillae and CT-innervated taste buds, indicating that these nerves interact in the tongue. It is not known if these changes seen in the peripheral nervous system are translated to the brain. The aim of this study is to examine if LX leads to changes in the nerve fiber endings of the CT (the terminal fields) where the nerve first contacts brain cells in the NTS. To determine this, we labeled rat CT terminal fields following LX. Experimental rats received LX, and the control group received a surgery where the lingual nerve was visualized but left intact. Sixteen or 50 days later, the CT was cut and labeled with a tracer. After two days, brains were extracted, sectioned, and processed so that terminal fields could be observed. Terminal field volumes were then calculated and compared between experimental groups. Data are currently being collected, but we expect that rats receiving LX will show a decrease in CT terminal field volume compared to control animals.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 12:45 PM Mar 4th, 2:15 PM

Interaction Between the Chorda Tympani and Lingual Nerve in the Brainstem

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Gustatory information is transmitted from the tongue to a brainstem area called the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) via taste fibers. The chorda tympani nerve (CT) transmits gustatory (sweet, salty, sour, bitter) information via taste buds in fungiform papillae. The lingual nerve transmits somatosensory information (hot, cold, spicy, menthol) from papillae tissue that surrounds the taste buds. The CT contacts taste buds directly, while the lingual nerve makes contact with papillae, but not taste buds. Lingual nerve cuts (LX) lead to morphological changes to both lingual-innervated fungiform papillae and CT-innervated taste buds, indicating that these nerves interact in the tongue. It is not known if these changes seen in the peripheral nervous system are translated to the brain. The aim of this study is to examine if LX leads to changes in the nerve fiber endings of the CT (the terminal fields) where the nerve first contacts brain cells in the NTS. To determine this, we labeled rat CT terminal fields following LX. Experimental rats received LX, and the control group received a surgery where the lingual nerve was visualized but left intact. Sixteen or 50 days later, the CT was cut and labeled with a tracer. After two days, brains were extracted, sectioned, and processed so that terminal fields could be observed. Terminal field volumes were then calculated and compared between experimental groups. Data are currently being collected, but we expect that rats receiving LX will show a decrease in CT terminal field volume compared to control animals.