Presentation Title

iPad Pilot Program: Graduate Student Tablet Technology Use in Clinical and Classroom Settings

Advisor Information

Shari DeVeney

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 4:00 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) To assess changes to graduate student self-reported behaviors and self-perceived competency levels with technology use in classroom and clinical settings and (2) to evaluate the execution of the pilot program for optimal delivery in subsequent semesters. Participants were graduate students (n=9) majoring in speech-language pathology. Students were surveyed using a 30-item questionnaire (15 Likert-scale statements; 15 open-ended questions) that addressed frequency, competency, and use of iPad applications. Surveys were administered at the beginning, middle, and end of semester, and at one-month follow-up. Data was analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Quantitatively, there was a significant difference in 5 out of 15 areas from Survey 1 to Survey 4. Frequency of clinical preparation and academic coursework increased significantly. Qualitative data was organized into three primary themes: (1) Frequency of iPad use for both clinical and academic purposes; (2) perceived competence with iPad use; and (3) overall experience with the iPad Pilot Program. Students also reported being more aware of evidence-based practice strategies for tablet technology. Self-reported reactions towards data collection and comfort exploring new iPad applications remained the same throughout the semester. Implications and study limitations are discussed.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 2:30 PM Mar 4th, 4:00 PM

iPad Pilot Program: Graduate Student Tablet Technology Use in Clinical and Classroom Settings

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) To assess changes to graduate student self-reported behaviors and self-perceived competency levels with technology use in classroom and clinical settings and (2) to evaluate the execution of the pilot program for optimal delivery in subsequent semesters. Participants were graduate students (n=9) majoring in speech-language pathology. Students were surveyed using a 30-item questionnaire (15 Likert-scale statements; 15 open-ended questions) that addressed frequency, competency, and use of iPad applications. Surveys were administered at the beginning, middle, and end of semester, and at one-month follow-up. Data was analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Quantitatively, there was a significant difference in 5 out of 15 areas from Survey 1 to Survey 4. Frequency of clinical preparation and academic coursework increased significantly. Qualitative data was organized into three primary themes: (1) Frequency of iPad use for both clinical and academic purposes; (2) perceived competence with iPad use; and (3) overall experience with the iPad Pilot Program. Students also reported being more aware of evidence-based practice strategies for tablet technology. Self-reported reactions towards data collection and comfort exploring new iPad applications remained the same throughout the semester. Implications and study limitations are discussed.