Presentation Title

Leptin, Adiponectin, and Ghrelin Responses to Hot, Cold and, Thermo-Neutral Environmental Temperatures During Endurance Exercise

Advisor Information

Dustin Slivka

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 4:00 PM

Abstract

A major contributor to obesity is having an excessive positive energy balance. The ability to manipulate the appetite-regulating hormones of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin may help to decrease excessive energy intake. Leptin is a satiety hormone that induces the feeling of being full when energy requirements have been meet by food intake. Adiponectin and ghrelin are hormones that initiate the feeling of hunger due to an energy imbalance. Exercise and exposure to extreme temperatures can independently affect these appetite-regulating hormones. There is little research investigating the effect that different extreme environmental temperatures during exercise may have on the regulation of these hormones. Purpose: To determine the effect that exercise in different environmental conditions has on the circulating concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin. Methods: Twelve recreationally trained male participants completed three different 1 h cycling bouts at 60% Wmax, followed by 3 h recovery at room temperature, on separate occasions. The experimental trials were completed using a repeated measures, counter-balanced design in three different environmental temperatures (7 °C, 20 °C, and 33 °C). These trials were separated by no less than four and no more than ten days. Blood was taken pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise, and 3h post-exercise. Blood was tested for hematocrit and hemoglobin to account for plasma volume shifts. Blood plasma was saved and frozen for later analysis. Analysis: Enzyme-linked immunoabsorbance assays (ELISA) will be run on the plasma samples to examine changes in leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin between trials. Data will be available at the time of presentation.

Comments

Winner of Outstanding Graduate Poster Presentation

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 4th, 2:30 PM Mar 4th, 4:00 PM

Leptin, Adiponectin, and Ghrelin Responses to Hot, Cold and, Thermo-Neutral Environmental Temperatures During Endurance Exercise

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

A major contributor to obesity is having an excessive positive energy balance. The ability to manipulate the appetite-regulating hormones of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin may help to decrease excessive energy intake. Leptin is a satiety hormone that induces the feeling of being full when energy requirements have been meet by food intake. Adiponectin and ghrelin are hormones that initiate the feeling of hunger due to an energy imbalance. Exercise and exposure to extreme temperatures can independently affect these appetite-regulating hormones. There is little research investigating the effect that different extreme environmental temperatures during exercise may have on the regulation of these hormones. Purpose: To determine the effect that exercise in different environmental conditions has on the circulating concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin. Methods: Twelve recreationally trained male participants completed three different 1 h cycling bouts at 60% Wmax, followed by 3 h recovery at room temperature, on separate occasions. The experimental trials were completed using a repeated measures, counter-balanced design in three different environmental temperatures (7 °C, 20 °C, and 33 °C). These trials were separated by no less than four and no more than ten days. Blood was taken pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise, and 3h post-exercise. Blood was tested for hematocrit and hemoglobin to account for plasma volume shifts. Blood plasma was saved and frozen for later analysis. Analysis: Enzyme-linked immunoabsorbance assays (ELISA) will be run on the plasma samples to examine changes in leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin between trials. Data will be available at the time of presentation.