Presentation Title

Effects of Uphill Walking and Visual Uphill Environments on Locomotor-Respiratory Coupling

Advisor Information

Jennifer Yentes

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2016 12:15 PM

Abstract

The objective of this research was to determine the effect uphill environments have on locomotor-respiratory coupling (the coordination between the locomotor and respiratory systems) using virtual reality and uphill walking. A secondary objective was to determine the effect visual uphill environments have on energy expenditure. To move any object against gravity requires energy, thus uphill walking requires more energy than level walking. However, even the perception of walking uphill, while actually walking on level ground could be similar to uphill walking. A similar response could be seen with the perception of level walking while actually walking uphill. Participants were asked to walk at their preferred walking speed on a treadmill that was either level (0%-grade) or inclined (10%-grade) while virtual reality was used to create an environment that appeared either level or inclined. Thus, the first four experimental conditions were level-level, level-inclined, inclined-inclined and inclined-level. A fifth condition used an oscillating level/incline virtual environment while walking on level ground. Respiration data was recorded using a resistive breathing sensor, energy expenditure was recorded using an indirect calorimeter which measures oxygen consumption, and locomotion was recorded using a 3-dimensional motion capture system which measures the position in space of reflective markers attached to specific anatomical locations on the participant’s body. Various coupling measures were used to compare the influence that breathing and walking had on each other during each condition. The volume of oxygen required was also compared for each trial. Data collections for this research project are still ongoing.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:15 PM

Effects of Uphill Walking and Visual Uphill Environments on Locomotor-Respiratory Coupling

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

The objective of this research was to determine the effect uphill environments have on locomotor-respiratory coupling (the coordination between the locomotor and respiratory systems) using virtual reality and uphill walking. A secondary objective was to determine the effect visual uphill environments have on energy expenditure. To move any object against gravity requires energy, thus uphill walking requires more energy than level walking. However, even the perception of walking uphill, while actually walking on level ground could be similar to uphill walking. A similar response could be seen with the perception of level walking while actually walking uphill. Participants were asked to walk at their preferred walking speed on a treadmill that was either level (0%-grade) or inclined (10%-grade) while virtual reality was used to create an environment that appeared either level or inclined. Thus, the first four experimental conditions were level-level, level-inclined, inclined-inclined and inclined-level. A fifth condition used an oscillating level/incline virtual environment while walking on level ground. Respiration data was recorded using a resistive breathing sensor, energy expenditure was recorded using an indirect calorimeter which measures oxygen consumption, and locomotion was recorded using a 3-dimensional motion capture system which measures the position in space of reflective markers attached to specific anatomical locations on the participant’s body. Various coupling measures were used to compare the influence that breathing and walking had on each other during each condition. The volume of oxygen required was also compared for each trial. Data collections for this research project are still ongoing.