Presentation Title

Examining the effect of losing good time on inmates subsequent behavior in prison

Advisor Information

Benjamin Steiner

Location

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2016 3:00 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 3:15 PM

Abstract

Sentencing credit laws (e.g., good time laws) provide opportunities for inmates to gain a reduction in their prison sentence. One of the intended goals of such laws is to promote prosocial behavior during imprisonment by offering inmates incentive for good behavior and/or deterring them from engaging in antisocial behavior. In theory, losing sentencing credits could deter inmates from engaging in subsequent antisocial behavior or it could amplify their deviant behavior. However, we are unaware of any studies that have assessed the effects of losing good time on offenders’ behavior. Using a sample of inmates housed in a Midwestern state’s prison system, we examine the effects of losing good time on offenders’ subsequent antisocial behavior in prison. We utilize two types of analyses (i.e., a longitudinal person-period data structure where time intervals (e.g., weeks) are nested within inmates and propensity score matching) in order to execute the most rigorous analyses.

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Mar 4th, 3:00 PM Mar 4th, 3:15 PM

Examining the effect of losing good time on inmates subsequent behavior in prison

UNO Criss Library, Room 232

Sentencing credit laws (e.g., good time laws) provide opportunities for inmates to gain a reduction in their prison sentence. One of the intended goals of such laws is to promote prosocial behavior during imprisonment by offering inmates incentive for good behavior and/or deterring them from engaging in antisocial behavior. In theory, losing sentencing credits could deter inmates from engaging in subsequent antisocial behavior or it could amplify their deviant behavior. However, we are unaware of any studies that have assessed the effects of losing good time on offenders’ behavior. Using a sample of inmates housed in a Midwestern state’s prison system, we examine the effects of losing good time on offenders’ subsequent antisocial behavior in prison. We utilize two types of analyses (i.e., a longitudinal person-period data structure where time intervals (e.g., weeks) are nested within inmates and propensity score matching) in order to execute the most rigorous analyses.