Presentation Title

The form and stability of visuomotor coordination is affected by the structure of the environment

Advisor Information

Steven Harrison

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 12:45 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 2:15 PM

Abstract

Coordination is foundational to all dimensions of human behavior. In this research we study visuomotor coordination (i.e. motor coordination that is constrained by perceptual variables detected by the visual perceptual system). Participants attempted to coordinate rhythmic movements of their arm with an oscillating target dot displayed on a screen. They were instructed to try and coordinate arm movements in either in-phase (moving in the same direction as the target dot) or out-of-phase (moving in the opposite direction of the target dot). We manipulated the frequency of coordination, increasing it in 0.1 Hz increments from 0.5 Hz to 2.5 Hz over the course of each trial. We also manipulated the richness of the visual environment that the task was performed within. In the visually minimal environment participants could only see the target dot. In a visually complex environment participants would see the target dot as well as their own motions and a visual background. When the visual environment was complex the stability of coordination was greater. Although stability was greater in this condition we observed a systematic relative phase in this condition that increased with frequency. We interpret this result as resulting from visual information revealing the misalignment of the body and the environment in the coordination task.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 12:45 PM Mar 4th, 2:15 PM

The form and stability of visuomotor coordination is affected by the structure of the environment

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Coordination is foundational to all dimensions of human behavior. In this research we study visuomotor coordination (i.e. motor coordination that is constrained by perceptual variables detected by the visual perceptual system). Participants attempted to coordinate rhythmic movements of their arm with an oscillating target dot displayed on a screen. They were instructed to try and coordinate arm movements in either in-phase (moving in the same direction as the target dot) or out-of-phase (moving in the opposite direction of the target dot). We manipulated the frequency of coordination, increasing it in 0.1 Hz increments from 0.5 Hz to 2.5 Hz over the course of each trial. We also manipulated the richness of the visual environment that the task was performed within. In the visually minimal environment participants could only see the target dot. In a visually complex environment participants would see the target dot as well as their own motions and a visual background. When the visual environment was complex the stability of coordination was greater. Although stability was greater in this condition we observed a systematic relative phase in this condition that increased with frequency. We interpret this result as resulting from visual information revealing the misalignment of the body and the environment in the coordination task.