Presentation Title

Push-off Work and Stride-to-Stride Fluctuations in Below Knee Prosthesis Users

Advisor Information

Kota Takahashi

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2016 4:00 PM

Abstract

A characteristic of healthy human walking is the capacity to produce the work necessary during push-off to propel the body forward. People with lower-limb amputation experience a decrease in this work output. Walking is further characterized by the presence of highly organized fluctuations from stride-to-stride. The presence of many movement disorders, including the use of a prosthesis, negatively affects the organization of these movement patterns generated from the stride-to-stride fluctuations. A previous study of persons with below-knee amputations showed significant differences in stride-to-stride fluctuations between different types of prostheses. Concurrently, below-knee prosthesis users also have differences in work output. The current study aimed to investigate if the changes in work observed between prostheses in below-knee prosthesis users were accompanied by corresponding changes in stride-to-stride fluctuations. Twenty-two participants were recruited to a 6-week study. Participants were fitted with a new prosthesis and allowed a 3- week adaptation period, after which they were fitted with a second prosthesis and allowed another 3-week adaptation period. The prostheses were classified as “more appropriate” or “less appropriate” according to the user’s activity level. Data collections were performed each week, where the participants walked on a treadmill as well as overground. A 52.3% (p <0.001) reduction in push-off work was observed from the more appropriate prosthesis to the less appropriate. A significant reduction in stride-to-stride fluctuations was not observed, nor was there a significant correlation between changes in work and stride-to-stride fluctuations (r =0.123, p =0.426). Further investigations will compare intact and prosthetic limb values.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 2:30 PM Mar 4th, 4:00 PM

Push-off Work and Stride-to-Stride Fluctuations in Below Knee Prosthesis Users

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

A characteristic of healthy human walking is the capacity to produce the work necessary during push-off to propel the body forward. People with lower-limb amputation experience a decrease in this work output. Walking is further characterized by the presence of highly organized fluctuations from stride-to-stride. The presence of many movement disorders, including the use of a prosthesis, negatively affects the organization of these movement patterns generated from the stride-to-stride fluctuations. A previous study of persons with below-knee amputations showed significant differences in stride-to-stride fluctuations between different types of prostheses. Concurrently, below-knee prosthesis users also have differences in work output. The current study aimed to investigate if the changes in work observed between prostheses in below-knee prosthesis users were accompanied by corresponding changes in stride-to-stride fluctuations. Twenty-two participants were recruited to a 6-week study. Participants were fitted with a new prosthesis and allowed a 3- week adaptation period, after which they were fitted with a second prosthesis and allowed another 3-week adaptation period. The prostheses were classified as “more appropriate” or “less appropriate” according to the user’s activity level. Data collections were performed each week, where the participants walked on a treadmill as well as overground. A 52.3% (p <0.001) reduction in push-off work was observed from the more appropriate prosthesis to the less appropriate. A significant reduction in stride-to-stride fluctuations was not observed, nor was there a significant correlation between changes in work and stride-to-stride fluctuations (r =0.123, p =0.426). Further investigations will compare intact and prosthetic limb values.